US Press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. GOP should pick Mitt Romney (Houston Chronicle)

The Republican primary race has descended into a bickering, bloody mess, accurately described by former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush and others as a circular firing squad. The Chroncile says: Stop the shooting.

2. Super PACs are ruining GOP (Politico)

Today is not Super Tuesday, argues Bill Schneider. It's super PAC Tuesday, and it's destroying the GOP.

3. How I would check Iran's nuclear ambition (Washington Post)

Mitt Romney describes how, as president, he would go further than Obama.

4. Limbaugh out of line - and apology was weak, too (San Francisco Chronicle)

Talk radio's Rush Limbaugh took civic discourse to a new low with his misogynistic belittling of Georgetown law student Sandra Fluke, says this editorial.

5. Rick Santorum Isn't Crazy (New York Times)

Whatever one thinks of the Republican presidential candidate's views on church and state, his opinion is not beyond the pale, writes Stanley Fish.

6. Natural electoral selection (Boston Globe) ($)

The natural selection that's occurring in the GOP race is pushing candidates into niches, says Farah Stockman -- but the nominee may have trouble attracting the mainstream.

7. Ultrasound in abortion should be a woman's choice (USA Today)

Decisions about legal medical procedures should be up to physicians and their patients, not state legislators.

8. US must expand, not suppress, voting rights (Chicago Sun Times)

According to Jesse Jackson, the current drive is the greatest insult to the Voting Rights Act since it was passed 47 years ago.

9. Romney in Ohio: Want College? Can't Afford It? Too Bad (New York Times)

David Firestone describes what modern Republican austerity looks like.

10. Girl Scouts evil? (Philadelphia Daily News)

The war on women - especially their contraceptive and reproductive rights - has entered a new, younger battleground, reports this leading article.

Getty
Show Hide image

Will anyone sing for the Brexiters?

The five acts booked to perform at pro-Brexit music festival Bpop Live are down to one.

Do Brexiters like music too? If the lineup of Bpoplive (or more accurately: “Brexit Live presents: Bpop Live”) is anything to go by, the answer is no. Ok, former lineup.

The anti-Europe rally-cum-music festival has already been postponed once, after the drum and bass duo Sigma cancelled saying they “weren’t told Bpoplive was a political event”.

But then earlier this week the party was back on, set for Sunday 19 June, 4 days before the referendum, and a week before Glastonbury, saving music lovers a difficult dilemma. The new lineup had just 5 acts: the 90s boybands East17 and 5ive, Alesha Dixon of Britain’s Got Talent and Strictly Come Dancing fame, family act Sister Sledge and Gwen Dickey of Rose Royce.

Unfortunately for those who have already shelled out £23 for a ticket, that 5 is now down to 1. First to pull out were 5ive, who told the Mirror that “as a band [they] have no political allegiances or opinions for either side.” Instead, they said, their “allegiance is first and foremost to their fans” - all 4our of them.

Next to drop was Alesha Dixon, whose spokesperson said that she decided to withdraw when it became clear that the event was to be “more of a political rally with entertainment included” than “a multi-artist pop concert in a fantastic venue in the heart of the UK”. Some reports suggested she was wary of sharing a platform with Nigel Farage, though she has no qualms about sitting behind a big desk with Simon Cowell.

A spokesperson for Sister Sledge then told Political Scrapbook that they had left the Brexit family too, swiftly followed by East 17 who decided not to stay another day.

So, it’s down to Gwen Dickey.

Dickey seems as yet disinclined to exit the Brexit stage, telling the Mirror: "I am not allowed to get into political matters in this lovely country and vote. It is not allowed as a American citizen living here. I have enough going on in my head and heart regarding matters in my own country at this time. Who will be the next President of the USA is of greater concern to me and for you?"

With the event in flux, it doesn’t look like the tickets are selling quickly.

In February, as David Cameron’s EU renegotiation floundered, the Daily Mail ran a front-page editorial asking “Who will speak for England?” Watch out for tomorrow’s update: “Who will sing for the Brexiters?”

I'm a mole, innit.