US press: pick of the papers

1. Mitt Romney camp's latest gaffe may be etched in history (Washington Post)

Etch a Sketch? Actually, it appeared more like Romney was playing Chutes and Ladders: He just landed on Space 87 and slid all the way back to 24, says Dana Milbank.

2. Politics, odors and soap (New York Times)

This year's Republican primaries have been a kaleidoscope of loyalty, authority and sanctity issues -- such as whether church-affiliated institutions can refuse to cover birth control in health insurance policies -- and that's perhaps why people like me have found the primaries so crazy, says Nicholas Kristof.

3. George Osborne's Budget (Wall Street Journal)

The worst part of Mr. Osborne's budget is that it keeps government in the dubious business of picking winners and losers, says this editorial.

4. The new globalist is homesick (New York Times)

The persistence of homesickness points to the limitations of the cosmopolitan philosophy that undergirds so much of our market and society, writes Susan Matt.

5. Romney's challenge to sway evangelical voters (Washington Post)

Outside of Mormon strongholds, voters most concerned about a candidate's religious views are rejecting Romney, writes E.J. Dionne Jr.

6. Don't close the GOP show (LA Times)

We in the mainstream media are just hoping to see the gaudy spectacle of this primary campaign continue as long as possible, says Doyle McManus.

7. Pope is coming -- time to round up dissidents (Star Tribune)

The church's coldness toward peaceful pro- democracy activists isn't all that surprising. Since 2009, Cardinal Ortega has become a de facto partner of Raul Castro, meeting with him regularly and encouraging his limited reforms, says this editorial.

8. Of super PACs and corruption (Politico)

It's time to rethink the whole relationship between independent spending and corruption, writes Richard Hasen.

9. Springsteen captures the state of America (Chicago Tribune)

One of the elder statesmen of American popular music delivers what might fairly be called a State of the Union address, writes Leonard Pitts.

10. Enough! Afghan war just isn't working (USA Today)

Bob Beckel says Afghanistan has been a tribal nation for centuries, and it will not become "democratic" soon, if ever, and Cal Thomas writes that the recent massacre of 16 Afghan civilians doesn't help us win the "hearts and minds" of the people we are trying to protect.

STF/AFP/Getty Images
Show Hide image

Must I unremember the day I wept over the long, slow suicide of a 27-year-old man?

At that time we did talk about the occupation of Ireland. Now we have to pretend we didn’t and it’s all the jolly UK and thank you, England for the peace process.

The misremembering of history interrupts these tales of my own squalid past. Very often I find myself wishing my memories were wrong, or that I’d forgotten more than I have. This would certainly be the case were I to be a politician, albeit a small-time one in big-time government. In the era of renunciations and sincere apologies, I would have to say sorry most of the time.

But I can’t. I can’t get past that clear day in May 1981, when the tangy cold spring air of a New York day got right inside me. Ambling home from another long, messy night in the Village, I was near 52nd when I saw people carrying a coffin.

“It’s not him, of course. It’s a fake coffin,” said a woman who saw the shock on my face. Maybe I was already crying. I knew and didn’t know but asked anyway.

“Yes. Bobby.”

Bobby Sands had died. Crowds were gathering with banners about Smashing Long Kesh and Smashing Thatcher.

The shock of it has never left me and God knows “martyrs” come two a penny now. Yet the idea that someone can starve themselves slowly to death for an idea is shocking. The idea that someone can let them do it, either “for” a United Ireland or “for” a United Kingdom, remains profoundly disturbing to me.

I need no lectures about what vile and murderous bastards the IRA were, or the numbers of innocents they killed. Nor about the smeary sentimentality of martyrdom itself. All I can say is that I had little idea of what “we” did in Ireland as long as I lived in England. A boy at school had run off to join the IRA. My mum said, “Well, he’s always been tapped, that one.”

We were kept ignorant. For some stupid reason, I did not think that Thatcher would let the hunger strikers die.

Their demands, remember, were the right not to wear prison uniform or to do prison work, rights to free association and education within the prison, one visit, one parcel, one letter a week. They wanted to be treated as political prisoners. Thatcher said Sands had no mandate. He was actually an MP, with more votes than she ever won in Finchley.

In New York that day, when we got to Third Avenue, there was anger and then solemnity. There were mumblings about what a death like that entailed . . . Mandela then instigated a hunger strike on Robben Island. There were protests in Milan and Ghent. French towns would name streets after Sands.

At that time, though, yes, we did talk about the occupation of Ireland. Now we have to pretend we didn’t and it’s all the jolly UK and thank you, England for the peace process.

So, must I unremember that day when I sat down on the pavement and wept over the long, slow suicide of a 27-year-old man? Let me know how to uncry all those tears shed for that terrible, terrible waste.

Suzanne Moore is a writer for the Guardian and the New Statesman. She writes the weekly “Telling Tales” column in the NS.

This article first appeared in the 01 October 2015 issue of the New Statesman, The Tory tide