US Press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. Reinforcing the church-state wall (LA Times)

Christianity thrives when the state stays out of its business and allows a marketplace of ideas to thrive, writes Jim Burkee.

2. The two Cadillacs fallacy (Washington Post)

Romney's rather authentic moments suggesting he doesn't understand the lives of average people (such as his comment on his wife's two Cadillacs) are dismissed as "gaffes," while Santorum's views on social issues are denounced as "extreme," says E.J. Dionne.

3. When Will Social Media Elect a President? (Wall Street Journal)

Twitter and Facebook will change US politics, as new technology always has. Think Nixon or 'Obama Girl,' says Andy Kessler.

4. Super PACs can't crown a king (Washington Post)

The one certainty about campaign finance laws is that all of them are, and ever will be, written by incumbent legislators, writes George Will.

5. A Civil Right to unionize (New York Times)

The greatest impediment to unions is weak and anachronistic labor laws, write Richard Kahlenberg and Moshe Marvit.

6. Romney and Paul, what a curious couple (Boston Globe) (£)

It's rare to see a bromance flourish in the hot glare of the GOP primary spotlight, but Mitt Romney and Ron Paul have something positively special going on, writes Joshua Green.

7. Fundraising: Obama's real priority (Politico)

The president has likely spent at least 200 hours, or 5 standard work weeks, filling his campaign coffers since April, says Reince Priebus.

8.Health care work force will be tested by reform (San Fransisco Chronicle)

Joanne Spetz asks whether the American health care work force large enough to handle the future needs of the country.

9. Time for Assad to go (USA Today)

For reasons of morality and the interest of not seeing violence in Syria build and expand outward, it is essential to try to accelerate the departure of Bashar Assad, writes Dennis Ross.

10. Who needs higher education? We've got the Redneck Yacht Club. (Miami Herald)

Florida's higher education mired in the mud, says Fred Grimm.

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“Trembling, shaking / Oh, my heart is aching”: the EU out campaign song will give you chills

But not in a good way.

You know the story. Some old guys with vague dreams of empire want Britain to leave the European Union. They’ve been kicking up such a big fuss over the past few years that the government is letting the public decide.

And what is it that sways a largely politically indifferent electorate? Strikes hope in their hearts for a mildly less bureaucratic yet dangerously human rights-free future? An anthem, of course!

Originally by Carly You’re so Vain Simon, this is the song the Leave.EU campaign (Nigel Farage’s chosen group) has chosen. It is performed by the singer Antonia Suñer, for whom freedom from the technofederalists couldn’t come any suñer.

Here are the lyrics, of which your mole has done a close reading. But essentially it’s just nature imagery with fascist undertones and some heartburn.

"Let the river run

"Let all the dreamers

"Wake the nation.

"Come, the new Jerusalem."

Don’t use a river metaphor in anything political, unless you actively want to evoke Enoch Powell. Also, Jerusalem? That’s a bit... strong, isn’t it? Heavy connotations of being a little bit too Englandy.

"Silver cities rise,

"The morning lights,

"The streets that meet them,

"And sirens call them on

"With a song."

Sirens and streets. Doesn’t sound like a wholly un-authoritarian view of the UK’s EU-free future to me.

"It’s asking for the taking,

"Trembling, shaking,

"Oh, my heart is aching."

A reference to the elderly nature of many of the UK’s eurosceptics, perhaps?

"We’re coming to the edge,

"Running on the water,

"Coming through the fog,

"Your sons and daughters."

I feel like this is something to do with the hosepipe ban.

"We the great and small,

"Stand on a star,

"And blaze a trail of desire,

"Through the dark’ning dawn."

Everyone will have to speak this kind of English in the new Jerusalem, m'lady, oft with shorten’d words which will leave you feeling cringéd.

"It’s asking for the taking.

"Come run with me now,

"The sky is the colour of blue,

"You’ve never even seen,

"In the eyes of your lover."

I think this means: no one has ever loved anyone with the same colour eyes as the EU flag.

I'm a mole, innit.