US politics from outside the beltway

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US Press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.{C}

1. The false Iran debate (New York Times)

In this sense, the whole Iran debate - with its receding "red lines," its shifting "zones of immunity," its threats and counter-threats, its bad metaphors and worse similes - is false, writes Roger Cohen.

2. What Could Be Next in the Race for President? (Roll Call)

Increasingly, former Speaker Newt Gingrich has become the Mr. Irrelevant in the GOP race for the presidential nomination, says Stuart Rothenberg.

3. Europe According to Hayek (Wall Street Journal) ($)

Twenty years after his death, the Austrian thinker still offers the most compelling explanation for the meltdown of the welfare state, writes Alberto Mingardi.

4. The economy, generically oversimplified (The Boston Globe) ($)

With the US economy steadily improving, Romney is now arguing that the recovery would be stronger but for the president's policies. Yet Romney would sound more convincing if his indictment of Obama weren't so familiar and generic, writes Scot Lehigh

5. Stand Your Ground tramples justice (Politico)

Trayvon Martin, a black child of 17, died at the invisible intersection of racial hatred and hating government, writes David Dante Troutt

6. The Descent of Hungary (Wall Street Journal)

How much can the European Union, by law a club of democracies, actually do to stop a freely elected government within its borders from turning its democracy into an autocracy? asks Raymond Zhong

7. When Did Hoodlums Start Wearing Hoods? (Slate)

London was plagued by young, unsupervised apprentice boys during the 12th century. They were always rioting over some political or religious issue, and they often wore hoods to hide their identities, says Brian Palmer

8. Ryan's challenge, Part 2 (Chicago Tribune)

By tackling entitlement costs, Paul Ryan asks Americans to choose their nation's future, says this Editorial.

9. Paranoia Strikes Deeper (New York Times)

Whatever Mr. Romney may personally believe, the fact is that by endorsing the right's paranoid fantasies, he is helping to further a dangerous trend in America's political life, writes Paul Krugman.

10. General Optimism (Slate)

Gen. John Allen believes that America will prevail in Afghanistan, writes Fred Kaplan