US press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. Can Europe's left rebound? (Washington Post)

There is still skepticism about the 42-year-old Miliband's capacity to win, though I confess a certain sympathy for him as the only leading British politician who is an ardent baseball fan -- and a Red Sox fan to boot, writes E.J. Dionne Jr.

2. The uses of polarization (New York Times)

The power of campaigns to create and motivate new swing voters dovetails with the political strategy of driving polarization, writes Thomas Edsall.

3. A lion in winter (Washington Post)

What's riveting about the documents taken from Osama bin Laden's compound, beyond the headline items about plots to kill American leaders, is the way they allow the reader to get inside the terrorist mastermind's head, writes David Ignatius.

4. France's race to the bottom (Wall Street Journal) (£)

Nicolas Sarkozy, the incumbent president, whom polls see gone for good in a few weeks, is courting the voters of France's far-right party, the National Front, says Pierre Briancon.

5. Death, by order of your president (Boston Globe) (£)

If you are a US citizen, the president of the United States can issue an order to have you killed without review or approval from any other branch of government. No president has ever asserted such authority, writes John E. Sununu.

6. Romney's car problem (LA Times)

By insisting that the auto industry bailout was a mistake, he hands Obama a clear line of attack, writes this editorial.

7. Iraq a testament to Barack Obama leadership (Politico)

The Iraq episode says a great deal about Obama's approach to national security: He is committed to charting a strategic, pragmatic course that safeguards American interests and values, writes Michele Flournoy.

8. Searching for Archie Bunker (New York Daily News)

Ever since Santorum's February resurgence, talking heads have said Santorum's working-class appeal spells trouble for Romney. In fact, that is a myth. Romney doesn't do that badly with working-class voters in the primaries, says John Stoehr.

9. No more Fukushimas: U.S. plants still face risks (Cleveland Plain Dealer)

Twenty-seven reactors have not made adequate provisions for earthquake protection, including Indian Point, the nuclear reactor within 25 miles of New York City, says Gwen L. Dubois.

10. To Save Israel, Boycott the Settlements (New York Times)

The Israeli government is erasing the "green line" that separates Israel proper from the West Bank, says Peter Beinart.

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Emmanuel Macron offers Theresa May no comfort on Brexit

The French presidential candidate warned that he would not accept "any caveat or any waiver" at a press briefing in London.

Emmanuel Macron, the new wunderkind of French politics, has brought his presidential campaign to London. The current favourite to succeed François Hollande has a natural electoral incentive to do so. London is home to 300,000 French voters, making it by France's sixth largest city by one count (Macron will address 3,000 people at a Westminster rally tonight). But the telegenic centrist also took the time to meet Theresa May and Philip Hammond and to hold a press briefing.

If May hoped that her invitation would help soften Macron's Brexit stance (the Prime Minister has refused to engage with his rival Marine Le Pen), she will have been left disappointed. Outside No.10, Macron declared that he hoped to attract "banks, talents, researchers, academics" away from the UK to France (a remark reminiscent of David Cameron's vow to "roll out the red carpet" for those fleeing Hollande). 

At the briefing at Westminster's Central Hall, Macron quipped: "The best trade agreement for Britain ... is called membership of the EU". With May determined to deliver Brexit, he suggested that the UK would have to settle for a Canadian-style deal, an outcome that would radically reduce the UK's market access. Macron emphasised that he took a a "classical, orthodox" view of the EU, regarding the "four freedoms" (of people, capital, goods and services) as indivisible. Were Britain to seek continued financial passporting, the former banker said, it would have to make a significant budget "contribution" and accept continued immigration. "The execution of Brexit has to be compliant with our interests and the European interest".

The 39-year-old avoided a nationalistic tone ("my perspective is not to say France, France, France") in favour of a "coordinated European approach" but was unambiguous: "I don't want to accept any caveat or any waiver to what makes the single market and the EU." Were the UK, as expected, to seek a transitional arrangement, it would have to accept the continued jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice.

Elsewhere, Macron insisted that his liberal economic stance was not an obstacle to his election. It would be fitting, he said, if the traditionally "contrarian" France embraced globalisation just as its counterparts were rejecting it. "In the current environment, if you're shy, you're dead," he declared. With his emotional, straight-talking approach (one derided by some as intellectually threadbare), Macron is seeking to beat the populists at their own game.

But his views on Brexit may yet prove academic. A poll published today showed him trailing centre-right candidate François Fillon (by 20-17) having fallen five points since his denunciation of French colonialism. Macron's novelty is both a strength and a weakness. With no established base (he founded his own party En Marche!), he is vulnerable to small swings in the public mood. If Macron does lose, it will not be for want of confidence. But there are unmistakable signs that his forward march has been halted. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.