US Press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. What Greece means (New York Times)

Greece -- like other European nations forced to impose austerity in a depressed economy -- seems doomed to many more years of suffering, writes Paul Krugman.

2. How to sink Iran's regime? Sanctions, not bombs (Washington Post)

The worst option in terms of regime change would probably be a unilateral Israeli military strike, writes David Ignatius.

3. The reproduction of privilege (New York Times)

Politically, the lack of access to a four-year college education is a crucial problem for one of the key battleground constituencies of 2012: whites without college degrees, says Thomas Edsall.

4. Greece's credit non-event (Wall Street Journal)

Greek's default is only one chapter of a much larger economic and political tragedy, but at this stage any good news is welcome, says this editorial.

5. Obama's politicized energy policy (Wall Street Journal) (£)

The Obama administration does have a national energy policy - it's just a subservient by-product of his radical environmental policy, writes Bobby Jindal.

6. Tough poses in a political theater (Boston Globe) (£)

Last week's annual meeting of the American-Israeli Public Affairs Committee was just theater... Progress in foreign affairs is less a stylized performance for an exclusive audience and more often improv wrapped in Greek tragedy, says Juliette Kayyem.

7. Obama vs. Israel (Chicago Tribune)

The new open-ended negotiations with Iran fit well with this strategy of tying Israel down, writes Charles Krauthammer.

8. Candidate media-bashing popular, but a losing tactic (USA Today)

Yes, the media are easy, sometimes deserving targets, and huffy outbursts against journalists during debates usually bring cheers from the crowd and could help fundraising. But as a strategy, it's misguided, writes Peter Funt.

9. Drop talk of war on Iran; let diplomacy, sanctions work (St. Louis Today)

There may some day be a case for intervention in Iran. Sooner than that there may be a case for intervention in Syria. But as a last resort, not the first one, says this editorial.

10. Defining the Occupy Movement: It's not just about the money (Oregonian)

Our lives are not just about the paycheck. Happiness depends on a balance between meaning and money. A real people's movement that aims for true solidarity, felt individually and collectively, can and should make room for both, writes Rich Cohen.

YouTube screengrab
Show Hide image

“Trembling, shaking / Oh, my heart is aching”: the EU out campaign song will give you chills

But not in a good way.

You know the story. Some old guys with vague dreams of empire want Britain to leave the European Union. They’ve been kicking up such a big fuss over the past few years that the government is letting the public decide.

And what is it that sways a largely politically indifferent electorate? Strikes hope in their hearts for a mildly less bureaucratic yet dangerously human rights-free future? An anthem, of course!

Originally by Carly You’re so Vain Simon, this is the song the Leave.EU campaign (Nigel Farage’s chosen group) has chosen. It is performed by the singer Antonia Suñer, for whom freedom from the technofederalists couldn’t come any suñer.

Here are the lyrics, of which your mole has done a close reading. But essentially it’s just nature imagery with fascist undertones and some heartburn.

"Let the river run

"Let all the dreamers

"Wake the nation.

"Come, the new Jerusalem."

Don’t use a river metaphor in anything political, unless you actively want to evoke Enoch Powell. Also, Jerusalem? That’s a bit... strong, isn’t it? Heavy connotations of being a little bit too Englandy.

"Silver cities rise,

"The morning lights,

"The streets that meet them,

"And sirens call them on

"With a song."

Sirens and streets. Doesn’t sound like a wholly un-authoritarian view of the UK’s EU-free future to me.

"It’s asking for the taking,

"Trembling, shaking,

"Oh, my heart is aching."

A reference to the elderly nature of many of the UK’s eurosceptics, perhaps?

"We’re coming to the edge,

"Running on the water,

"Coming through the fog,

"Your sons and daughters."

I feel like this is something to do with the hosepipe ban.

"We the great and small,

"Stand on a star,

"And blaze a trail of desire,

"Through the dark’ning dawn."

Everyone will have to speak this kind of English in the new Jerusalem, m'lady, oft with shorten’d words which will leave you feeling cringéd.

"It’s asking for the taking.

"Come run with me now,

"The sky is the colour of blue,

"You’ve never even seen,

"In the eyes of your lover."

I think this means: no one has ever loved anyone with the same colour eyes as the EU flag.

I'm a mole, innit.