US Press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. G.O.P. Greek tragedy (New York Times)

With Sanctorum and Robo-Romney in a race to the bottom, the once ruthless Republican Party seems to have pretty much decided to cave on 2012 and start planning for a post-Obama world, writes Maureen Dowd.

2. Santorum's failed pandering to blue-collar workers (Washington Post)

What Santorum was obliquely referring to is his sense that today's college and university campuses are hotbeds of socialism and liberal theology, says Kathleen Parker.

3. There be dragons (New York Times)

In medieval times, areas known to be dangerous or uncharted were often labeled on maps with the warning: "Beware, here be dragons." That is surely how mapmakers would be labeling the whole Middle East today, says Thomas Friedman

4. The conservative case for foreign aid (Wall Street Journal) (£)

Reagan knew that diplomacy and development policy neutralize threats before they become crises, says John Kerry.

5. Mormon ritual is no threat to Jews (Boston Globe) (£)

The Mormon practice of "baptism by proxy" is eccentric, not offensive, because in Judaism, conversion after death is a concept without meaning, writes Jeff Jacoby.

6. Mitt Romney's acceptance speech, in (mostly) his own words (Washington Post)

Dana Milbank imagines who Mitt Romney might thank should he receive the Republican nomination: Goldman Sachs, JPMorgan Chase, Morgan Stanley and Credit Suisse to name a few.

7. Race to the far right dims GOP's chances in November (Detroit Free Press)

The duration and intensity of the past month's intramural bloodletting will make it much harder for either to compete for the independent voters that will be decisive in November's general election, writes this editorial.

8. Auto bailout worked, candidates should admit it (USA Today)

The two leading candidates for the Republican presidential nomination keep pounding away, unmindful of how divorced from economic reality they appear, says this editorial.

9. Canada's carbon lesson: Just put a price on it (LA Times)

Five years ago, the province of British Columbia launched a quest to slash its carbon emissions. Here's what it has learned, writes Chris Wood.

10. On social media, teens are the experts (Philadelphia Inquirer)

We must talk early and often to our teens about both the dangers of drug and alcohol abuse and the difficulties of living in a world where more of what they do is public, writes Amy Jordan.

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Stephen Hawking's enthusiasm for colonising space makes him almost as bad as Trump

The physicist's inistence on mankind's expansion risks making him a handmaiden of inequality.

“Spreading out may be the only thing that saves us from ourselves,” Stephen Hawking has warned. And he’s not just talking about surviving the UK's recent run of record breaking heat. If humanity doesn’t start sending people to Mars soon, then in a few hundred years he says we can all expect to be kaput; there just isn’t enough space for us all.

The theoretical physicist gave his address to the glittering Starmus Festival of science and arts in Norway. According to the BBC, he argued that climate change and the depletion of natural resources help make space travel essential. With this in mind, he would like to see a mission to Mars by 2025 and a new lunar base within 30 years.

He even took a swipe at Donald Trump: “I am not denying the importance of fighting climate change and global warming, unlike Donald Trump, who may just have taken the most serious, and wrong, decision on climate change this world has seen.”

Yet there are striking similarities between Hawking's statement and the President's bombast. For one thing there was the context in which it was made - an address to a festival dripping with conspicuous consumption, where 18 carat gold OMEGA watches were dished out as prizes.

More importantly there's the inescapable reality that space colonisation is an inherently elitist affair: under Trump you may be able to pay your way out of earthly catastrophe, while for Elon Musk, brawn could be a deciding advantage, given he wants his early settlers on Mars to be able to dredge up buried ice.

Whichever way you divide it up, it is unlikely that everyone will be able to RightMove their way to a less crowded galaxy. Hell, most people can’t even make it to Starmus itself (€800  for a full price ticket), where the line-up of speakers is overwhelmingly white and male.

So while this obsession with space travel has a certain nobility, it also risks elevating earthly inequalities to an interplanetary scale.

And although Hawking is right to call out Trump on climate change, the concern that space travel diverts money from saving earth's ecosystems still stands. 

In a context where the American government is upping NASA’s budget for manned space flights at the same time as it cuts funds for critical work observing the changes on earth, it is imperative that the wider science community stands up against this worrying trend.

Hawking's enthusiasm for colonising the solar system risks playing into the hands of the those who share the President destructive views on the climate, at the expense of the planet underneath us.

India Bourke is an environment writer and editorial assistant at the New Statesman.

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