US Press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. G.O.P. Greek tragedy (New York Times)

With Sanctorum and Robo-Romney in a race to the bottom, the once ruthless Republican Party seems to have pretty much decided to cave on 2012 and start planning for a post-Obama world, writes Maureen Dowd.

2. Santorum's failed pandering to blue-collar workers (Washington Post)

What Santorum was obliquely referring to is his sense that today's college and university campuses are hotbeds of socialism and liberal theology, says Kathleen Parker.

3. There be dragons (New York Times)

In medieval times, areas known to be dangerous or uncharted were often labeled on maps with the warning: "Beware, here be dragons." That is surely how mapmakers would be labeling the whole Middle East today, says Thomas Friedman

4. The conservative case for foreign aid (Wall Street Journal) (£)

Reagan knew that diplomacy and development policy neutralize threats before they become crises, says John Kerry.

5. Mormon ritual is no threat to Jews (Boston Globe) (£)

The Mormon practice of "baptism by proxy" is eccentric, not offensive, because in Judaism, conversion after death is a concept without meaning, writes Jeff Jacoby.

6. Mitt Romney's acceptance speech, in (mostly) his own words (Washington Post)

Dana Milbank imagines who Mitt Romney might thank should he receive the Republican nomination: Goldman Sachs, JPMorgan Chase, Morgan Stanley and Credit Suisse to name a few.

7. Race to the far right dims GOP's chances in November (Detroit Free Press)

The duration and intensity of the past month's intramural bloodletting will make it much harder for either to compete for the independent voters that will be decisive in November's general election, writes this editorial.

8. Auto bailout worked, candidates should admit it (USA Today)

The two leading candidates for the Republican presidential nomination keep pounding away, unmindful of how divorced from economic reality they appear, says this editorial.

9. Canada's carbon lesson: Just put a price on it (LA Times)

Five years ago, the province of British Columbia launched a quest to slash its carbon emissions. Here's what it has learned, writes Chris Wood.

10. On social media, teens are the experts (Philadelphia Inquirer)

We must talk early and often to our teens about both the dangers of drug and alcohol abuse and the difficulties of living in a world where more of what they do is public, writes Amy Jordan.

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Donald Trump vs Barack Obama: How the inauguration speeches compared

We compared the two presidents on trade, foreign affairs and climate change – so you (really, really) don't have to.

After watching Donald Trump's inaugural address, what better way to get rid of the last few dregs of hope than by comparing what he said with Barack Obama's address from 2009? 

Both thanked the previous President, with Trump calling the Obamas "magnificent", and pledged to reform Washington, but the comparison ended there. 

Here is what each of them said: 

On American jobs

Obama:

The state of our economy calls for action, bold and swift.  And we will act, not only to create new jobs, but to lay a new foundation for growth.  We will build the roads and bridges, the electric grids and digital lines that feed our commerce and bind us together.  We'll restore science to its rightful place, and wield technology's wonders to raise health care's quality and lower its cost.  We will harness the sun and the winds and the soil to fuel our cars and run our factories.  And we will transform our schools and colleges and universities to meet the demands of a new age.

Trump:

For many decades we've enriched foreign industry at the expense of American industry, subsidized the armies of other countries while allowing for the very sad depletion of our military.

One by one, the factories shuttered and left our shores with not even a thought about the millions and millions of American workers that were left behind.

Obama had a plan for growth. Trump just blames the rest of the world...

On global warming

Obama:

With old friends and former foes, we'll work tirelessly to lessen the nuclear threat, and roll back the specter of a warming planet.

Trump:

On the Middle East:

Obama:

To the Muslim world, we seek a new way forward, based on mutual interest and mutual respect. To those leaders around the globe who seek to sow conflict, or blame their society's ills on the West, know that your people will judge you on what you can build, not what you destroy. 

Trump:

We will re-enforce old alliances and form new ones and unite the civilized world against radical Islamic terrorism, which we will eradicate completely from the face of the earth.

On “greatness”

Obama:

In reaffirming the greatness of our nation we understand that greatness is never a given. It must be earned.

Trump:

America will start winning again, winning like never before.

 

On trade

Obama:

This is the journey we continue today.  We remain the most prosperous, powerful nation on Earth.  Our workers are no less productive than when this crisis began.  Our minds are no less inventive, our goods and services no less needed than they were last week, or last month, or last year.  Our capacity remains undiminished.  

Trump:

We must protect our borders from the ravages of other countries making our product, stealing our companies and destroying our jobs.

Protection will lead to great prosperity and strength. I will fight for you with every breath in my body, and I will never ever let you down.

Stephanie Boland is digital assistant at the New Statesman. She tweets at @stephanieboland