US press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. Pain without gain (New York Times)

We could actually do a lot to help our economies simply by reversing the destructive austerity of the last two years, writes Paul Krugman.

2. Iran as continual regional menace (Politico)

Tehren is likely to increase these terrorist activities, based on the belief that nuclear weapons could provide an umbrella and that its regional enemies are weak and irresolute, says Stephen Blank.

3. Is this the end of market democracy? (New York Times)

Thomas Edsall asks: What if the legitimacy of free market capitalism in America is facing fundamental challenges that the candidates and their parties are not addressing?

4. The super PAC confusion (Washington Post)

What it has done is compromise basic First Amendment rights, clutter politics with baffling laws and regulations and actually deepen cynicism, writes Robert Samuelson.

5. Political double standard: GOP astounds in its hypocrisy (Oregonian)

This Republican presidential campaign is demonstrating conclusively that there is an unbridgeable divide between the philosophical commitments conservative candidates make before they are elected and what they will have to do when faced with the day-to-day demands of practical governance, writes E.J. Dionne Jr.

6. Liberals vs. conservatives (Los Angeles Times)

I equate Republicans' political views with thoughtlessness, intolerance and narcissism, says Diana Wagman.

7. Conservatives vs. liberals (Los Angeles Times)

There is no "how" in talking to a liberal. You can't talk to a liberal, period, writes Charlotte Allen.

8. Teacher's right -- kids need to know history of n-word (Chicago Sun Times)

As Joan Rivers likes to say, "Can we talk?" Apparently not. Not when it comes to the n-word, says this editorial.

9. The lush Life (New York Post)

Should public employees be treated substantially better than everyone else? Asks this editorial.

10. Why Romney can, and should, win evangelical vote (USA Today)

Think values, not stereotypes. Plus, we're picking a president, not a pastor, argues Nancy French.

 

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Donald Trump vs Barack Obama: How the inauguration speeches compared

We compared the two presidents on trade, foreign affairs and climate change – so you (really, really) don't have to.

After watching Donald Trump's inaugural address, what better way to get rid of the last few dregs of hope than by comparing what he said with Barack Obama's address from 2009? 

Both thanked the previous President, with Trump calling the Obamas "magnificent", and pledged to reform Washington, but the comparison ended there. 

Here is what each of them said: 

On American jobs

Obama:

The state of our economy calls for action, bold and swift.  And we will act, not only to create new jobs, but to lay a new foundation for growth.  We will build the roads and bridges, the electric grids and digital lines that feed our commerce and bind us together.  We'll restore science to its rightful place, and wield technology's wonders to raise health care's quality and lower its cost.  We will harness the sun and the winds and the soil to fuel our cars and run our factories.  And we will transform our schools and colleges and universities to meet the demands of a new age.

Trump:

For many decades we've enriched foreign industry at the expense of American industry, subsidized the armies of other countries while allowing for the very sad depletion of our military.

One by one, the factories shuttered and left our shores with not even a thought about the millions and millions of American workers that were left behind.

Obama had a plan for growth. Trump just blames the rest of the world...

On global warming

Obama:

With old friends and former foes, we'll work tirelessly to lessen the nuclear threat, and roll back the specter of a warming planet.

Trump:

On the Middle East:

Obama:

To the Muslim world, we seek a new way forward, based on mutual interest and mutual respect. To those leaders around the globe who seek to sow conflict, or blame their society's ills on the West, know that your people will judge you on what you can build, not what you destroy. 

Trump:

We will re-enforce old alliances and form new ones and unite the civilized world against radical Islamic terrorism, which we will eradicate completely from the face of the earth.

On “greatness”

Obama:

In reaffirming the greatness of our nation we understand that greatness is never a given. It must be earned.

Trump:

America will start winning again, winning like never before.

 

On trade

Obama:

This is the journey we continue today.  We remain the most prosperous, powerful nation on Earth.  Our workers are no less productive than when this crisis began.  Our minds are no less inventive, our goods and services no less needed than they were last week, or last month, or last year.  Our capacity remains undiminished.  

Trump:

We must protect our borders from the ravages of other countries making our product, stealing our companies and destroying our jobs.

Protection will lead to great prosperity and strength. I will fight for you with every breath in my body, and I will never ever let you down.

Stephanie Boland is digital assistant at the New Statesman. She tweets at @stephanieboland