US press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. Pain without gain (New York Times)

We could actually do a lot to help our economies simply by reversing the destructive austerity of the last two years, writes Paul Krugman.

2. Iran as continual regional menace (Politico)

Tehren is likely to increase these terrorist activities, based on the belief that nuclear weapons could provide an umbrella and that its regional enemies are weak and irresolute, says Stephen Blank.

3. Is this the end of market democracy? (New York Times)

Thomas Edsall asks: What if the legitimacy of free market capitalism in America is facing fundamental challenges that the candidates and their parties are not addressing?

4. The super PAC confusion (Washington Post)

What it has done is compromise basic First Amendment rights, clutter politics with baffling laws and regulations and actually deepen cynicism, writes Robert Samuelson.

5. Political double standard: GOP astounds in its hypocrisy (Oregonian)

This Republican presidential campaign is demonstrating conclusively that there is an unbridgeable divide between the philosophical commitments conservative candidates make before they are elected and what they will have to do when faced with the day-to-day demands of practical governance, writes E.J. Dionne Jr.

6. Liberals vs. conservatives (Los Angeles Times)

I equate Republicans' political views with thoughtlessness, intolerance and narcissism, says Diana Wagman.

7. Conservatives vs. liberals (Los Angeles Times)

There is no "how" in talking to a liberal. You can't talk to a liberal, period, writes Charlotte Allen.

8. Teacher's right -- kids need to know history of n-word (Chicago Sun Times)

As Joan Rivers likes to say, "Can we talk?" Apparently not. Not when it comes to the n-word, says this editorial.

9. The lush Life (New York Post)

Should public employees be treated substantially better than everyone else? Asks this editorial.

10. Why Romney can, and should, win evangelical vote (USA Today)

Think values, not stereotypes. Plus, we're picking a president, not a pastor, argues Nancy French.

 

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Will anyone sing for the Brexiters?

The five acts booked to perform at pro-Brexit music festival Bpop Live are down to one.

Do Brexiters like music too? If the lineup of Bpoplive (or more accurately: “Brexit Live presents: Bpop Live”) is anything to go by, the answer is no. Ok, former lineup.

The anti-Europe rally-cum-music festival has already been postponed once, after the drum and bass duo Sigma cancelled saying they “weren’t told Bpoplive was a political event”.

But then earlier this week the party was back on, set for Sunday 19 June, 4 days before the referendum, and a week before Glastonbury, saving music lovers a difficult dilemma. The new lineup had just 5 acts: the 90s boybands East17 and 5ive, Alesha Dixon of Britain’s Got Talent and Strictly Come Dancing fame, family act Sister Sledge and Gwen Dickey of Rose Royce.

Unfortunately for those who have already shelled out £23 for a ticket, that 5 is now down to 1. First to pull out were 5ive, who told the Mirror that “as a band [they] have no political allegiances or opinions for either side.” Instead, they said, their “allegiance is first and foremost to their fans” - all 4our of them.

Next to drop was Alesha Dixon, whose spokesperson said that she decided to withdraw when it became clear that the event was to be “more of a political rally with entertainment included” than “a multi-artist pop concert in a fantastic venue in the heart of the UK”. Some reports suggested she was wary of sharing a platform with Nigel Farage, though she has no qualms about sitting behind a big desk with Simon Cowell.

A spokesperson for Sister Sledge then told Political Scrapbook that they had left the Brexit family too, swiftly followed by East 17 who decided not to stay another day.

So, it’s down to Gwen Dickey.

Dickey seems as yet disinclined to exit the Brexit stage, telling the Mirror: "I am not allowed to get into political matters in this lovely country and vote. It is not allowed as a American citizen living here. I have enough going on in my head and heart regarding matters in my own country at this time. Who will be the next President of the USA is of greater concern to me and for you?"

With the event in flux, it doesn’t look like the tickets are selling quickly.

In February, as David Cameron’s EU renegotiation floundered, the Daily Mail ran a front-page editorial asking “Who will speak for England?” Watch out for tomorrow’s update: “Who will sing for the Brexiters?”

I'm a mole, innit.