US press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. Romney's liberal message on poverty (Washington Post)

Romney needs to listen to the words of Ronald Reagan, whose birthday we celebrate today, says Marc A. Thiessen.

2. Java and Justice (New York Times)

If you're among the fair-minded Americans who believe that two men or two women should be able to wed, there's an easy though slightly caloric way to express that, writes Frank Bruni.

3. Obama and the 'Bitter' Clingers -- Round Two (Wall Street Journal)

Where's Catholic Joe Biden on the contraception mandate? Asks this editorial.

4. The front-runner who leaves the GOP cold (Washington Post)

Mitt Romney is going to be the nominee. Eat your peas, Republicans, and then fall in line, because Romney's the guy. Right? Writes Eugene Robinson.

5. The poverty problem: More than Mitt Romney's PR misstep (Politico)

The real problem is bad policy and values -- not a bad interview, argues Tom Perriello.

6. Cairo crumbling (New York Post)

First came the Egyptian revolution -- whereupon it was only a matter of time before the show trials began, says this editorial.

7. Good day for Santorum could scramble GOP race again (Washington Examiner)

There isn't much polling for the three states holding contests on Tuesday, but one survey in Minnesota put Santorum slightly ahead of Romney, who is coming off wins in Florida and Nevada, writes Byron York.

8. Never let law profs near the Oval Office (Washington Examiner)

Constitutional law professors should be kept as far away from nuclear weapons as possible, argues Gene Healy.

9. Who would be Romney's running mate? (Chicago Tribune)

Mitt Romney is making good progress toward winning the Republican nomination, and if he stays at it, he'll soon have to start considering his first big decision as the GOP standard-bearer: His running mate, says Steve Chapman.

10. Fairer presidential pardons (Los Angeles Times)

Eliminating bias against minorities is easier said than done, but some reforms are obvious, says this editorial.

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Donald Trump's inauguration signals the start of a new and more unstable era

A century in which the world's hegemonic power was a rational actor is about to give way to a more terrifying reality. 

For close to a century, the United States of America has been the world’s paramount superpower, one motivated by, for good and for bad, a rational and predictable series of motivations around its interests and a commitment to a rules-based global order, albeit one caveated by an awareness of the limits of enforcing that against other world powers.

We are now entering a period in which the world’s paramount superpower is neither led by a rational or predictable actor, has no commitment to a rules-based order, and to an extent it has any guiding principle, they are those set forward in Donald Trump’s inaugural: “we will follow two simple rules: hire American and buy American”, “from this day forth, it’s going to be America first, only America first”.

That means that the jousting between Trump and China will only intensify now that he is in office.  The possibility not only of a trade war, but of a hot war, between the two should not be ruled out.

We also have another signal – if it were needed – that he intends to turn a blind eye to the actions of autocrats around the world.

What does that mean for Brexit? It confirms that those who greeted the news that an US-UK trade deal is a “priority” for the incoming administration, including Theresa May, who described Britain as “front of the queue” for a deal with Trump’s America, should prepare themselves for disappointment.

For Europe in general, it confirms what should already been apparent: the nations of Europe are going to have be much, much more self-reliant in terms of their own security. That increases Britain’s leverage as far as the Brexit talks are concerned, in that Britain’s outsized defence spending will allow it acquire goodwill and trade favours in exchange for its role protecting the European Union’s Eastern border.

That might allow May a better deal out of Brexit than she might have got under Hillary Clinton. But there’s a reason why Trump has increased Britain’s heft as far as security and defence are concerned: it’s because his presidency ushers in an era in which we are all much, much less secure. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.