US press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. Romney's liberal message on poverty (Washington Post)

Romney needs to listen to the words of Ronald Reagan, whose birthday we celebrate today, says Marc A. Thiessen.

2. Java and Justice (New York Times)

If you're among the fair-minded Americans who believe that two men or two women should be able to wed, there's an easy though slightly caloric way to express that, writes Frank Bruni.

3. Obama and the 'Bitter' Clingers -- Round Two (Wall Street Journal)

Where's Catholic Joe Biden on the contraception mandate? Asks this editorial.

4. The front-runner who leaves the GOP cold (Washington Post)

Mitt Romney is going to be the nominee. Eat your peas, Republicans, and then fall in line, because Romney's the guy. Right? Writes Eugene Robinson.

5. The poverty problem: More than Mitt Romney's PR misstep (Politico)

The real problem is bad policy and values -- not a bad interview, argues Tom Perriello.

6. Cairo crumbling (New York Post)

First came the Egyptian revolution -- whereupon it was only a matter of time before the show trials began, says this editorial.

7. Good day for Santorum could scramble GOP race again (Washington Examiner)

There isn't much polling for the three states holding contests on Tuesday, but one survey in Minnesota put Santorum slightly ahead of Romney, who is coming off wins in Florida and Nevada, writes Byron York.

8. Never let law profs near the Oval Office (Washington Examiner)

Constitutional law professors should be kept as far away from nuclear weapons as possible, argues Gene Healy.

9. Who would be Romney's running mate? (Chicago Tribune)

Mitt Romney is making good progress toward winning the Republican nomination, and if he stays at it, he'll soon have to start considering his first big decision as the GOP standard-bearer: His running mate, says Steve Chapman.

10. Fairer presidential pardons (Los Angeles Times)

Eliminating bias against minorities is easier said than done, but some reforms are obvious, says this editorial.

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Turkey's turmoil should worry David Cameron

Splits in the Turkish government could play into the Brexiteers' hands.

While Britain focused on Sadiq v Zac and Cameron v Corbyn, in Turkey an even more dramatic contest was coming to a head. For weeks there has been growing speculation about a split between Ahmet Davutoğlu, the wonkish prime minster, and President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, the macho, mercurial kingpin of Turkish politics. The two men have differed over a growing crackdown on freedom of expression, the conflict with Kurdish militants in Turkey’s south east and Erdoğan’s ambitions to strengthen his own power. Yesterday, a nervous-sounding Davutoğlu confirmed on live television that he would leave his post.

To outside observers, this might seem like a faraway power struggle between two men with unpronounceable names. But it matters for Britain and the impending EU referendum in two crucial ways.

1. It throws the EU-Turkey refugee deal into doubt

The controversial €6bn agreement to stem the flows to Europe was born of the strong relationship between Davutoğlu and German Chancellor Angela Merkel. Not only does President Erdoğan have a far more ambivalent attitude towards the EU. He has also made Merkel’s life difficult by demanding the prosecution of a German comedian who penned a crude poem about him.

Though much criticised, the EU-Turkey deal has dramatically reduced the numbers being smuggled by sea to Greece. If it collapses, Europe could be heading for a repeat of last year’s crisis, when more than 800,000 people arrived on Greek shores. In Britain, such scenes will only fuel concern about migration - a key driver of anti-EU sentiment.

2. It plays into the narrative of the Brexit camp

Brexiteers have already sought to use Erdoğan’s growing illiberalism - and Turkey’s aspirations to join the EU - to win people over to their side. Turkey’s “palace coup” (as the opposition newspaper Cumhuriyet called it) cements the image of Erdoğan as an all-powerful leader who will not tolerate dissent. The accusations against Turkey are often ill-informed and tinged with Islamophobia. But they are clearly seen as effective by both sides in the referendum campaign. Only this week, David Cameron was forced to distance himself from his previous enthusiasm for Turkish accession, insisting that the prospect would not be on the cards “for decades.”

For now, Erdoğan’s intentions towards the EU deal are unclear. Perhaps he would like to take credit for visa-free travel for Turkish citizens to the Schengen Zone (but not the UK) - an attractive perk promised in return for Turkey’s cooperation. But it is just as easy to imagine him watching it collapse before railing against the perfidious west.

Either way, there will be nerves in Brussels, Berlin and London. Diplomats see the president as a much more difficult partner than Davutoğlu. “Erdoğan has to be handled very carefully,” said one official. “If Jean-Claude Juncker says something too blunt, who knows what will happen?”

Turkey still has several hurdles to clear before visa-free travel is approved. Ankara has made clear that it will not hold up its end of the bargain if the promise is not fulfilled. With the deadline for implementation set for the last day in June, the deal could begin imploding towards the end of next month. That, David Cameron will surely note with a gulp, would be just in time for the EU referendum.