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US press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. Romney's liberal message on poverty (Washington Post)

Romney needs to listen to the words of Ronald Reagan, whose birthday we celebrate today, says Marc A. Thiessen.

2. Java and Justice (New York Times)

If you're among the fair-minded Americans who believe that two men or two women should be able to wed, there's an easy though slightly caloric way to express that, writes Frank Bruni.

3. Obama and the 'Bitter' Clingers -- Round Two (Wall Street Journal)

Where's Catholic Joe Biden on the contraception mandate? Asks this editorial.

4. The front-runner who leaves the GOP cold (Washington Post)

Mitt Romney is going to be the nominee. Eat your peas, Republicans, and then fall in line, because Romney's the guy. Right? Writes Eugene Robinson.

5. The poverty problem: More than Mitt Romney's PR misstep (Politico)

The real problem is bad policy and values -- not a bad interview, argues Tom Perriello.

6. Cairo crumbling (New York Post)

First came the Egyptian revolution -- whereupon it was only a matter of time before the show trials began, says this editorial.

7. Good day for Santorum could scramble GOP race again (Washington Examiner)

There isn't much polling for the three states holding contests on Tuesday, but one survey in Minnesota put Santorum slightly ahead of Romney, who is coming off wins in Florida and Nevada, writes Byron York.

8. Never let law profs near the Oval Office (Washington Examiner)

Constitutional law professors should be kept as far away from nuclear weapons as possible, argues Gene Healy.

9. Who would be Romney's running mate? (Chicago Tribune)

Mitt Romney is making good progress toward winning the Republican nomination, and if he stays at it, he'll soon have to start considering his first big decision as the GOP standard-bearer: His running mate, says Steve Chapman.

10. Fairer presidential pardons (Los Angeles Times)

Eliminating bias against minorities is easier said than done, but some reforms are obvious, says this editorial.