US press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. America's drone wars (LA Times)

Obama's comments on drone strikes should start the process of greater openness about the program, especially the targeted killing of Americans, says this editorial.

2. The cost of a bloody florida battle (New York Times)

Mitt Romney is the victor in Florida, but he's the worse for wear, writes David Firestone.

3. The media loves Newt (Washington Post)

We love your feigned umbrage and your wild superlatives. We admire the way you frequently send us to Google to test your veracity, writes Dana Milbank.

4. Is he unelectable? (Wall Street Journal)

The case against the case against Romney, made by James Taranto.

5. The politics of dignity (New York Times)

You may think that the situations in Egypt and Russia have nothing in common. Think again, says Thomas Friedman.

6. America's waning influence (LA Times)

Any honest diplomat will tell you that American power and global influence is waning, and if we shy away from acknowledging that fact, we'll only speed up the process, writes Rosa Brooks.

7. In censorship, Twitter fails to defend free speech (San Fransisco Chronicle)

Twitter is trying to make a good-faith effort to uphold the values of transparency and free speech while complying with the laws of countries that have no respect for either, says this editorial.

8. Implementing health reform (Politico)

Consumers dread choosing health insurance, largely because they don't understand it, says Lynn Quincy.

9. Stop bothering the Fed, you peasant taxpayers! (Miami Herald)

When it comes to the Fed, the press plays more like one of those toy poodles that sits in your lap, says Glenn Garvin.

10. Right-to-work laws stand for choice (Boston Globe)

Soon, Indiana will be the first state in more than a decade that has succeeded in banning labor contracts that oblige all employees to pay money to a union as a condition of employment, writes Jeff Jacoby.

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Britain is running out of allies as it squares up to Russia

For whatever reason, Donald Trump is going to be no friend of an anti-Russia foreign policy.

The row over Donald Trump and that dossier rumbles on.

Nothing puts legs on a story like a domestic angle, and that the retired spy who compiled the file is a one of our own has excited Britain’s headline writers. The man in question, Christopher Steele, has gone to ground having told his neighbour to look after his cats before vanishing.

Although the dossier contains known errors, Steele is regarded in the intelligence community as a serious operator not known for passing on unsubstantiated rumours, which is one reason why American intelligence is investigating the claims.

“Britain's role in Trump dossier” is the Telegraph’s splash, “The ‘credible’ ex-MI6 man behind Trump Russia report” is the Guardian’s angle, “British spy in hiding” is the i’s splash.

But it’s not only British headline writers who are exercised by Mr Steele; the Russian government is too. “MI6 officers are never ex,” the Russian Embassy tweeted, accusing the UK of “briefing both ways - against Russia and US President”. “Kremlin blames Britain for Trump sex storm” is the Mail’s splash.

Elsewhere, Crispin Blunt, the chair of the Foreign Affairs Select Committee, warns that relations between the United Kingdom and Russia are as “bad as they can get” in peacetime.

Though much of the coverage of the Trump dossier has focused on the eyecatching claims about whether or not the President-Elect was caught in a Russian honeytrap, the important thing, as I said yesterday, is that the man who is seven days from becoming President of the United States, whether through inclination or intimidation, is not going to be a reliable friend of the United Kingdom against Russia.

Though Emanuel Macron might just sneak into the second round of the French presidency, it still looks likely that the final choice for French voters will be an all-Russia affair, between Francois Fillon and Marine Le Pen.

For one reason or another, Britain’s stand against Russia looks likely to be very lonely indeed.

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.