US press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. Newt Gingrich, you're no Ronald Reagan (Politico)

Newt Gingrich thinks he's Ronald Reagan and 2012 is 1976, says Bill Schneider.

2. Syria: It's not just about freedom (Washington Post)

Imperial regimes can crack when they are driven out of their major foreign outposts, argues Charles Krauthammer.

3. Romney Isn't Concerned (New York Times)

If you're an American down on your luck, Mitt Romney has a message for you: He doesn't feel your pain, says Paul Krugman.

4. Government Cannot Create Sustainable Jobs (Wall Street Journal)

Useful jobs don't exist until producers discover them. Stimulating demand can at best return an economy to the pre-slump status quo, writes Arnold Kling.

5. An election that hinges on the smallest of errors? (Washington Post)

he granting of Secret Service protection following Mitt Romney's decisive Florida victory did not prevent him from immediately shooting himself in the foot, says Michael Gerson.

6. India's strategic importance to the US (Boston Globe)

If coping with a more powerful China will be the great challenge for the United States in the next half century, India may be the great opportunity, writes Nicholas Burns.

7. A matter of faith (Chicago Tribune)

HHS should provide a broader conscience exemption on contraceptive coverage, argues this editorial.

8. Stop harassing the Koch brothers (Politico)

President Barack Obama and his allies, including those in Congress, have shown what a nasty, personal and abusive reelection campaign we are about to experience, writes Mike Pompeo.

9. Phony college rankings (San Francisco Chronicle)

Claremont McKenna College - an elite liberal arts institution near Los Angeles - is admitting a campus official fudged the SAT scores of incoming freshmen to boost its place in advisory publications heavily used by would-be students and parents. No one should be shocked, says this editorial.

10. School nutrition: A kid's right to choose (Los Angeles Times)

As the federal government plans to improve nutrition in school lunchrooms, it's important to look at what works, and what doesn't, argues David R. Just and Brian Wansink.

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When Donald Trump talks, remember that Donald Trump almost always lies

Anyone getting excited about a trade deal between the United States and the United Kingdom should pay more attention to what Trump does, not what he says. 

Celebrations all round at the Times, which has bagged the first British newspaper interview with President-Elect Donald Trump.

Here are the headlines: he’s said that the EU has become a “vehicle for Germany”, that Nato is “obsolete” as it hasn’t focused on the big issue of the time (tackling Islamic terrorism), and that he expects that other countries will join the United Kingdom in leaving the European Union.

But what will trigger celebrations outside of the News Building is that Trump has this to say about a US-UK trade deal: his administration will ““work very hard to get it done quickly and done properly”. Time for champagne at Downing Street?

When reading or listening to an interview with Donald Trump, don’t forget that this is the man who has lied about, among other things, who really paid for gifts to charity on Celebrity Apprentice, being named Michigan’s Man of the Year in 2011, and making Mexico pay for a border wall between it and the United States. So take everything he promises with an ocean’s worth of salt, and instead look at what he does.   

Remember that in the same interview, the President-Elect threatened to hit BMW with sanctions over its decision to put a factory in Mexico, not the United States. More importantly, look at the people he is appointing to fill key trade posts: they are not free traders or anything like it. Anyone waiting for a Trump-backed trade deal that is “good for the UK” will wait a long time.

And as chess champion turned Putin-critic-in-chief Garry Kasparov notes on Twitter, it’s worth noting that Trump’s remarks on foreign affairs are near-identical to Putin’s. The idea that Nato’s traditional purpose is obsolete and that the focus should be on Islamic terrorism, meanwhile, will come as a shock to the Baltic states, and indeed, to the 650 British soldiers who have been sent to Estonia and Poland as part of a Nato deployment to deter Russian aggression against those countries.

All in all, I wouldn’t start declaring the new President is good news for the UK just yet.

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.