US press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. Newt Gingrich, you're no Ronald Reagan (Politico)

Newt Gingrich thinks he's Ronald Reagan and 2012 is 1976, says Bill Schneider.

2. Syria: It's not just about freedom (Washington Post)

Imperial regimes can crack when they are driven out of their major foreign outposts, argues Charles Krauthammer.

3. Romney Isn't Concerned (New York Times)

If you're an American down on your luck, Mitt Romney has a message for you: He doesn't feel your pain, says Paul Krugman.

4. Government Cannot Create Sustainable Jobs (Wall Street Journal)

Useful jobs don't exist until producers discover them. Stimulating demand can at best return an economy to the pre-slump status quo, writes Arnold Kling.

5. An election that hinges on the smallest of errors? (Washington Post)

he granting of Secret Service protection following Mitt Romney's decisive Florida victory did not prevent him from immediately shooting himself in the foot, says Michael Gerson.

6. India's strategic importance to the US (Boston Globe)

If coping with a more powerful China will be the great challenge for the United States in the next half century, India may be the great opportunity, writes Nicholas Burns.

7. A matter of faith (Chicago Tribune)

HHS should provide a broader conscience exemption on contraceptive coverage, argues this editorial.

8. Stop harassing the Koch brothers (Politico)

President Barack Obama and his allies, including those in Congress, have shown what a nasty, personal and abusive reelection campaign we are about to experience, writes Mike Pompeo.

9. Phony college rankings (San Francisco Chronicle)

Claremont McKenna College - an elite liberal arts institution near Los Angeles - is admitting a campus official fudged the SAT scores of incoming freshmen to boost its place in advisory publications heavily used by would-be students and parents. No one should be shocked, says this editorial.

10. School nutrition: A kid's right to choose (Los Angeles Times)

As the federal government plans to improve nutrition in school lunchrooms, it's important to look at what works, and what doesn't, argues David R. Just and Brian Wansink.

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Will anyone sing for the Brexiters?

The five acts booked to perform at pro-Brexit music festival Bpop Live are down to one.

Do Brexiters like music too? If the lineup of Bpoplive (or more accurately: “Brexit Live presents: Bpop Live”) is anything to go by, the answer is no. Ok, former lineup.

The anti-Europe rally-cum-music festival has already been postponed once, after the drum and bass duo Sigma cancelled saying they “weren’t told Bpoplive was a political event”.

But then earlier this week the party was back on, set for Sunday 19 June, 4 days before the referendum, and a week before Glastonbury, saving music lovers a difficult dilemma. The new lineup had just 5 acts: the 90s boybands East17 and 5ive, Alesha Dixon of Britain’s Got Talent and Strictly Come Dancing fame, family act Sister Sledge and Gwen Dickey of Rose Royce.

Unfortunately for those who have already shelled out £23 for a ticket, that 5 is now down to 1. First to pull out were 5ive, who told the Mirror that “as a band [they] have no political allegiances or opinions for either side.” Instead, they said, their “allegiance is first and foremost to their fans” - all 4our of them.

Next to drop was Alesha Dixon, whose spokesperson said that she decided to withdraw when it became clear that the event was to be “more of a political rally with entertainment included” than “a multi-artist pop concert in a fantastic venue in the heart of the UK”. Some reports suggested she was wary of sharing a platform with Nigel Farage, though she has no qualms about sitting behind a big desk with Simon Cowell.

A spokesperson for Sister Sledge then told Political Scrapbook that they had left the Brexit family too, swiftly followed by East 17 who decided not to stay another day.

So, it’s down to Gwen Dickey.

Dickey seems as yet disinclined to exit the Brexit stage, telling the Mirror: "I am not allowed to get into political matters in this lovely country and vote. It is not allowed as a American citizen living here. I have enough going on in my head and heart regarding matters in my own country at this time. Who will be the next President of the USA is of greater concern to me and for you?"

With the event in flux, it doesn’t look like the tickets are selling quickly.

In February, as David Cameron’s EU renegotiation floundered, the Daily Mail ran a front-page editorial asking “Who will speak for England?” Watch out for tomorrow’s update: “Who will sing for the Brexiters?”

I'm a mole, innit.