US politics from outside the beltway

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US Press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. Ghastly Outdated Party (New York Times)

Republicans are getting queasy at the gruesome sight of their party eating itself alive, says Maureen Dowd.

2. I work for Uncle Sam, and I'm proud of it (Washington Post)

It's time to stop bashing federal employees, writes Jason Ullner.

3. Halftime in Detroit (Wall Street Journal) (£)

Taxpayers will be paying for the auto bailouts for decades to come, writes George Melloan.

4. Obama's dream: To run against Santorum (Washington Post)

Rick Santorum is a good man. He's just a good man in the wrong century, says Kathleen Parker.

5. Fighting L.A.'s gangs with families (LA Times)

L.A. Deputy Mayor Guillermo Cespedes' effort to fight gangs is working, writes Jim Newton.

6. What ails Europe? (New York Times)

Why has Europe become the sick man of the world economy? Everyone knows the answer. Unfortunately, most of what people know isn't true, writes Paul Krugman.

7. Trickle-down environmentalism lacks public support (The Examiner)

When it comes to buying electric cars, the headlines may be about going green, but the reality is most Americans say they'll be motivated to go electric for a far more mundane reason: When the price of gas gets too high, they'll switch, writes Scott Rasmussen.

8. Obama policies threaten America's energy boom (Politico)

It's time for the president to stop stifling American energy and start encouraging the development of all our nation's energy resources, writes Sen. John Thune.

9. As Santorum rises, so does scrutiny (USA Today)

The spotlight has begun to give Santorum a difficult problem: the characteristic most responsible for his rise -- his authenticity as a social conservative -- is also his greatest vulnerability, says this editorial.

10. The enduring fallacy of the CEO president (Politico)

Disagreements are central to politics -- Does life begin at conception? Is health care a right? Should we end the Fed? But they are more foreign to business, writes John Paul Rollert.