US Press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. Who Decided That This Election Should Be About Sex? (New York Times)

David Brooks and Gail Collins discuss the surprising role debates over contraception, abortion and unwed mothers have played so far in the campaign.

2. Two miscast candidates (Washington Post)

Mitt Romney and Rick Santorum still look like weak nominees, writes George F. Will.

3. Big cases on high court docket highlight need to allow cameras (Boston Globe) ($)

This editorial argues that giving viewers a chance to witness oral arguments before the Supreme Court would enhance respect for the Constitution, the court, and its procedures.

4. Obama's defense of religion (Chicago Tribune)

Steve Chapman explains how the President has expanded freedom for the faithful.

5. Getting Iran to back down on its nuclear program (Washington Post)

A threat of overwhelming force could force retreat, writes David Ignatius.

6. The Incredible Disappearing 2013 Obama Budget (Roll Call) ($)

Stan Collender notes that even in a city like Washington, D.C., the speed with which the Obama budget went from lead story to old news was impressive.

7. Teacher's right (Chicago Sun Times)

Against the ruling of an Illinois public school, this editorial argues that kids need to know the history of the n-word

8. Healthcare reform's missing link -- nurse practitioners (Los Angeles Times)

Millions more Americans soon may be searching for primary care providers. Nurse practitioners can do the job and save taxpayer funds, says Patricia Dennehy.

9. NY Knicks' Jeremy Lin shows no sign of cover jinx (New York Daily News)

A second straight Sports Illustrated cover can't slow the media sensation caused by this basketball star, writes Filip Bondy.

10. US leadership at World Bank remains critical (Washington Times)

Robert Zoellick's announcement that he would not seek another term as president of the World Bank has begun anew an old debate: Senator John Kerry asks: should an American continue to lead this institution?

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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Boris Johnson as Foreign Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs.

The world shared a stunned silence when news broke that Boris Johnson would be the new Foreign Secretary. Johnson, who once referred to black people as “piccaninnies” and more recently accused the half-Kenyan President of the United States of only commenting on the EU referendum because of bitterness about colonialism, will now be Britain’s representative on the world stage.

His colourful career immediately came back to haunt him when US journalists accused him of “outright lies” and reminded him of the time he likened Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton to a “sadistic nurse”. Johnson’s previous appearances on the international stage include a speech in Beijing where he maintained that ping pong was actually the Victorian game of “whiff whaff”.

But Johnson has always been more than a blond buffoon, and this appointment is a shrewd one by May. His popularity in the country at large, apparently helped by getting stuck on a zip line and having numerous affairs, made him an obvious threat to David Cameron’s premiership. His decision to defect to the Leave campaign was widely credited with bringing it success. He canned his leadership campaign after Michael Gove launched his own bid, but the question of whether his chutzpah would beat May’s experience and gravity is still unknown.

In giving BoJo the Foreign Office, then, May hands him the photo opportunities he craves. Meanwhile, the man with real power in international affairs will be David Davis, who as Brexit minister has the far more daunting task of renegotiating Britain’s trade deals.