US Press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. Who Decided That This Election Should Be About Sex? (New York Times)

David Brooks and Gail Collins discuss the surprising role debates over contraception, abortion and unwed mothers have played so far in the campaign.

2. Two miscast candidates (Washington Post)

Mitt Romney and Rick Santorum still look like weak nominees, writes George F. Will.

3. Big cases on high court docket highlight need to allow cameras (Boston Globe) ($)

This editorial argues that giving viewers a chance to witness oral arguments before the Supreme Court would enhance respect for the Constitution, the court, and its procedures.

4. Obama's defense of religion (Chicago Tribune)

Steve Chapman explains how the President has expanded freedom for the faithful.

5. Getting Iran to back down on its nuclear program (Washington Post)

A threat of overwhelming force could force retreat, writes David Ignatius.

6. The Incredible Disappearing 2013 Obama Budget (Roll Call) ($)

Stan Collender notes that even in a city like Washington, D.C., the speed with which the Obama budget went from lead story to old news was impressive.

7. Teacher's right (Chicago Sun Times)

Against the ruling of an Illinois public school, this editorial argues that kids need to know the history of the n-word

8. Healthcare reform's missing link -- nurse practitioners (Los Angeles Times)

Millions more Americans soon may be searching for primary care providers. Nurse practitioners can do the job and save taxpayer funds, says Patricia Dennehy.

9. NY Knicks' Jeremy Lin shows no sign of cover jinx (New York Daily News)

A second straight Sports Illustrated cover can't slow the media sensation caused by this basketball star, writes Filip Bondy.

10. US leadership at World Bank remains critical (Washington Times)

Robert Zoellick's announcement that he would not seek another term as president of the World Bank has begun anew an old debate: Senator John Kerry asks: should an American continue to lead this institution?

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When Donald Trump talks, remember that Donald Trump almost always lies

Anyone getting excited about a trade deal between the United States and the United Kingdom should pay more attention to what Trump does, not what he says. 

Celebrations all round at the Times, which has bagged the first British newspaper interview with President-Elect Donald Trump.

Here are the headlines: he’s said that the EU has become a “vehicle for Germany”, that Nato is “obsolete” as it hasn’t focused on the big issue of the time (tackling Islamic terrorism), and that he expects that other countries will join the United Kingdom in leaving the European Union.

But what will trigger celebrations outside of the News Building is that Trump has this to say about a US-UK trade deal: his administration will ““work very hard to get it done quickly and done properly”. Time for champagne at Downing Street?

When reading or listening to an interview with Donald Trump, don’t forget that this is the man who has lied about, among other things, who really paid for gifts to charity on Celebrity Apprentice, being named Michigan’s Man of the Year in 2011, and making Mexico pay for a border wall between it and the United States. So take everything he promises with an ocean’s worth of salt, and instead look at what he does.   

Remember that in the same interview, the President-Elect threatened to hit BMW with sanctions over its decision to put a factory in Mexico, not the United States. More importantly, look at the people he is appointing to fill key trade posts: they are not free traders or anything like it. Anyone waiting for a Trump-backed trade deal that is “good for the UK” will wait a long time.

And as chess champion turned Putin-critic-in-chief Garry Kasparov notes on Twitter, it’s worth noting that Trump’s remarks on foreign affairs are near-identical to Putin’s. The idea that Nato’s traditional purpose is obsolete and that the focus should be on Islamic terrorism, meanwhile, will come as a shock to the Baltic states, and indeed, to the 650 British soldiers who have been sent to Estonia and Poland as part of a Nato deployment to deter Russian aggression against those countries.

All in all, I wouldn’t start declaring the new President is good news for the UK just yet.

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.