US press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. This War Is Not Over Yet (New York Times)

President Obama can't have it both ways: if the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan are ending, the detention of enemy prisoners without charges must end, too, argues Mary L. Dudziak.

2. The super PAC arms race (Oregonian)

The Obama campaign's move goes beyond unilateral disarmament. It amounts to dangerous proliferation in the nuclear arms race of campaign spending, writes Ruth Marcus.

3. New global deal on climate change (Politico)

The U.S. is now a member of a bold new initiative that brings hope for national action, says John D. Podesta and Andrew Light.

4. Presidential history lesson: Talk less, promise less (USA Today)

Someday, maybe a president will simply promise to run the government well, defend the country from its enemies, let us sort out our problems more on our own, and leave the miracle-working to God, writes Steven Hayward.

5. A 'cosmic wager' on the Muslim Brotherhood (Washington Post)

The Obama administration has made what might be described as a "cosmic wager" on the Muslim Brotherhood's peaceful intentions, writes David Ignatius.

6. On budget, 10 is not enough (Politico)

We need to start using a 25-year window if we want to be fiscally honest, writes Michael A. Peterson.

7. If Iran already has the bomb, what then? (Washington Times)

The White House and Congress should immediately cooperate on programs to achieve regime change in Iran - by supporting and arming the majority of the Iranian people who want to overthrow the mullahs, says Peter Pry.

8. Egypt's cold shoulder (Los Angeles Times)

A sudden new wave of anti-Americanism is thriving in Cairo, says David Schenker.

9. Mitt Romney's Thirst (New York Times)

Romney's attempt to portray himself as "severely conservative" just isn't cutting it, says Charles M. Blow.

10. Acting Out on ACTA (Wall Street Journal)

Internet populism threatens another antipiracy campaign, argues this editorial.

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“Trembling, shaking / Oh, my heart is aching”: the EU out campaign song will give you chills

But not in a good way.

You know the story. Some old guys with vague dreams of empire want Britain to leave the European Union. They’ve been kicking up such a big fuss over the past few years that the government is letting the public decide.

And what is it that sways a largely politically indifferent electorate? Strikes hope in their hearts for a mildly less bureaucratic yet dangerously human rights-free future? An anthem, of course!

Originally by Carly You’re so Vain Simon, this is the song the Leave.EU campaign (Nigel Farage’s chosen group) has chosen. It is performed by the singer Antonia Suñer, for whom freedom from the technofederalists couldn’t come any suñer.

Here are the lyrics, of which your mole has done a close reading. But essentially it’s just nature imagery with fascist undertones and some heartburn.

"Let the river run

"Let all the dreamers

"Wake the nation.

"Come, the new Jerusalem."

Don’t use a river metaphor in anything political, unless you actively want to evoke Enoch Powell. Also, Jerusalem? That’s a bit... strong, isn’t it? Heavy connotations of being a little bit too Englandy.

"Silver cities rise,

"The morning lights,

"The streets that meet them,

"And sirens call them on

"With a song."

Sirens and streets. Doesn’t sound like a wholly un-authoritarian view of the UK’s EU-free future to me.

"It’s asking for the taking,

"Trembling, shaking,

"Oh, my heart is aching."

A reference to the elderly nature of many of the UK’s eurosceptics, perhaps?

"We’re coming to the edge,

"Running on the water,

"Coming through the fog,

"Your sons and daughters."

I feel like this is something to do with the hosepipe ban.

"We the great and small,

"Stand on a star,

"And blaze a trail of desire,

"Through the dark’ning dawn."

Everyone will have to speak this kind of English in the new Jerusalem, m'lady, oft with shorten’d words which will leave you feeling cringéd.

"It’s asking for the taking.

"Come run with me now,

"The sky is the colour of blue,

"You’ve never even seen,

"In the eyes of your lover."

I think this means: no one has ever loved anyone with the same colour eyes as the EU flag.

I'm a mole, innit.