US press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. From founders to decorators, Facebook riches (New York Times)

Facebook's public offering will make a lot of billionaires and millionaires, writes Nick Bilton.

2. The income inequality faced by LGBT families (Washington Post)

Some American families are at a greater disadvantage than others simply because of whom the adults in those families love, writes Jonathan Capehart.

3.. The attack the GOP should be waging against president (Boston Globe)

It's impossible to claim that Obama is both a socialist and also a pawn of Wall Street - and by opting for the former, Republicans have probably chosen the weaker line of attack, argues Joshua Green.

4. Romney, Gingrich and the Power of Ideas (Wall Street Journal)

The front-runner is tilted too heavily toward biography and not nearly enough toward policy, says Karl Rove.

5. When streamlined isn't better (Politico)

Obama's team should not mistake slight reductions in personnel and budgets for the creation of more effective and responsive government institutions, argues Robert Mosbacher JR.

6. Mitt Romney won in Florida but lost overall (Washington Post)

Romney's decisive victory in Florida came at a price, says E.J. Dionne Jr.

7. What's a Republican Feminist To Do? (New York Times)

In the winter line-up of Republican presidential candidates, a moderate pro-choice Republican woman has no choice, writes Jamie Stiehm.

8. Looking for morning America (Miami Herald)

Under Reagan, optimism about the future was the Republican brand. But that brand has curdled in the ensuing 30 years, writes Leonard Pitts Jr.

9. US should be urging Iraqi's release (Philadelphia Inquirer)

The Whitehouse should use its influence to ensure the release of Dr Riyadh al-Adhadh, writes Trudy Rubin.

10. Catholic Church's unfair attack against Obama (Boston Globe)

Last Sunday, the Catholic Church declared war on President Obama, writes Joan Vennochi.

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Britain is running out of allies as it squares up to Russia

For whatever reason, Donald Trump is going to be no friend of an anti-Russia foreign policy.

The row over Donald Trump and that dossier rumbles on.

Nothing puts legs on a story like a domestic angle, and that the retired spy who compiled the file is a one of our own has excited Britain’s headline writers. The man in question, Christopher Steele, has gone to ground having told his neighbour to look after his cats before vanishing.

Although the dossier contains known errors, Steele is regarded in the intelligence community as a serious operator not known for passing on unsubstantiated rumours, which is one reason why American intelligence is investigating the claims.

“Britain's role in Trump dossier” is the Telegraph’s splash, “The ‘credible’ ex-MI6 man behind Trump Russia report” is the Guardian’s angle, “British spy in hiding” is the i’s splash.

But it’s not only British headline writers who are exercised by Mr Steele; the Russian government is too. “MI6 officers are never ex,” the Russian Embassy tweeted, accusing the UK of “briefing both ways - against Russia and US President”. “Kremlin blames Britain for Trump sex storm” is the Mail’s splash.

Elsewhere, Crispin Blunt, the chair of the Foreign Affairs Select Committee, warns that relations between the United Kingdom and Russia are as “bad as they can get” in peacetime.

Though much of the coverage of the Trump dossier has focused on the eyecatching claims about whether or not the President-Elect was caught in a Russian honeytrap, the important thing, as I said yesterday, is that the man who is seven days from becoming President of the United States, whether through inclination or intimidation, is not going to be a reliable friend of the United Kingdom against Russia.

Though Emanuel Macron might just sneak into the second round of the French presidency, it still looks likely that the final choice for French voters will be an all-Russia affair, between Francois Fillon and Marine Le Pen.

For one reason or another, Britain’s stand against Russia looks likely to be very lonely indeed.

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.