US press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. Obama's lucky break (Washington Post)

It's nine months until Election Day, but President Obama is already bringing out the big guns, writes Dana Milbank.

2. The Zuckerberg Tax (New York Times)

To fix a flaw in our tax system, mark-to-market taxation would require the superwealthy to pay at least a little income tax on their unsold stock shares, says David S. Miller.

3. Empowering Burma's voices of change (Politico)

After almost a half-century of military dictatorship, Burma is now sending signals that it is ready to change direction and rebuild its relationship with the United States, writes Sen. John F. Kerry.

4. Obama and Romney exhibit striking similarities (Washington Post)

The general election is shaping up as a contest between two remarkably similar men, says Ruth Marcus.

5. ObamaCare's Great Awakening (Wall Street Journal)

HHS tells religious believers to go to hell. The public notices, says this editorial.

6. All eyes on Israel: Will it act against world's best interest? (Star Tribune)

Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta is refreshingly frank, sometimes stunningly so, writes Trudy Rubin.

7. America's culture is coming apart at the seams (Chicago Tribune)

This may sound a little odd, but I believe that I need to pay more attention to white people, writes Clarence Page.

8. What Wikipedia Won't Tell You (New York Times)

Policy makers had recognized a constitutional (and economic) imperative to protect American property from theft, to shield consumers from counterfeit products and fraud, and to combat foreign criminals who exploit technology to steal American ingenuity and jobs, writes Carey H. Sherman.

9. 'Super' subliminal politics in Chrysler ad? (San Francisco Chronicle)

It would be hard to craft a more perfect soft-sell pitch for President Obama's re-election than Chrysler's "It's Halftime in America" Super Bowl spot featuring Clint Eastwood, argues this editorial.

10. Why Mitt Romney? He's ready to rebuild American success (Washington Times)

The time has come for the Republican Party to close the deal. I believe Mitt Romney is the best choice for the presidency, says Donald J. Trump.

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Donald Trump is the Republican nominee. What now?

So a Clinton-Trump general election is assured – a historically unpopular match-up based on their current favourability ratings.

That’s it. Ted Cruz bowed out of the Republican presidential race last night, effectively handing the nomination to Donald Trump. “From the beginning I’ve said that I would continue on as long as there was a viable path to victory,” Cruz said. “Tonight, I’m sorry to say it appears that path has been foreclosed.”

What foreclosed his path was his sizeable loss to Trump in Indiana. Cruz had bet it all on the Hoosier State, hoping to repeat his previous Midwest victories in Iowa and Wisconsin. He formed a pact with John Kasich, whereby Kasich left the anti-Trump field clear for Cruz in Indiana in return for Cruz not campaigning in Oregon and New Mexico. He announced Carly Fiorina as his vice-presidential nominee last week, hoping the news would give him a late boost.

It didn’t work. Donald Trump won Indiana handily, with 53 per cent of the vote to Cruz’s 37 per cent. Trump won all of the state’s nine congressional districts, and so collected all 57 of the convention delegates on offer. He now has 1,014 delegates bound to him on the convention’s first ballot, plus 34 unbound delegates who’ve said they’ll vote for him (according to Daniel Nichanian’s count).

That leaves Trump needing just 189 more to hit the 1,237 required for the nomination – a number he was very likely to hit in the remaining contests before Cruz dropped out (it’s just 42 per cent of the 445 available), and that he is now certain to achieve. No need to woo more unbound delegates. No contested convention. No scrambling for votes on the second ballot. 

Though Bernie Sanders narrowly won the Democratic primary in Indiana, he’s still 286 pledged delegates short of Hillary Clinton. He isn’t going to win the 65 per cent of remaining delegates he’d need to catch up. Clinton now needs just 183 more delegates to reach the required 2,383. Like Trump, she is certain to reach that target on 7 June when a number of states vote, including the largest: California.

So a Clinton-Trump general election is assured – a historically unpopular match-up based on their current favourability ratings. But while Clinton is viewed favourably by 42 per cent of voters and unfavourably by 55%, Trump is viewed favourably by just 35 per cent and unfavourably by a whopping 61 per cent. In head-to-head polling (which isn’t particularly predictive this far from election day), Clinton leads with 47 per cent to Trump’s 40 per cent. Betting markets make Clinton the heavy favourite, with a 70 per cent chance of winning the presidency in November.

Still, a few questions that remain as we head into the final primaries and towards the party conventions in July: how many Republican officeholders will reluctantly endorse Trump, how many will actively distance themselves from him, and how many will try to remain silent? Will a conservative run as an independent candidate against Trump in the general election? Can Trump really “do presidential” for the next six months, as he boasted recently, and improve on his deep unpopularity?

And on the Democratic side: will Sanders concede gracefully and offer as full-throated an endorsement of Clinton as she did of Barack Obama eight years ago? It was on 7 June 2008 that she told her supporters: “The way to continue our fight now, to accomplish the goals for which we stand is to take our energy, our passion, our strength, and do all we can to help elect Barack Obama, the next president of the United States.” Will we hear something similar from Sanders next month? 

Jonathan Jones writes for the New Statesman on American politics.