US press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. Obama's lucky break (Washington Post)

It's nine months until Election Day, but President Obama is already bringing out the big guns, writes Dana Milbank.

2. The Zuckerberg Tax (New York Times)

To fix a flaw in our tax system, mark-to-market taxation would require the superwealthy to pay at least a little income tax on their unsold stock shares, says David S. Miller.

3. Empowering Burma's voices of change (Politico)

After almost a half-century of military dictatorship, Burma is now sending signals that it is ready to change direction and rebuild its relationship with the United States, writes Sen. John F. Kerry.

4. Obama and Romney exhibit striking similarities (Washington Post)

The general election is shaping up as a contest between two remarkably similar men, says Ruth Marcus.

5. ObamaCare's Great Awakening (Wall Street Journal)

HHS tells religious believers to go to hell. The public notices, says this editorial.

6. All eyes on Israel: Will it act against world's best interest? (Star Tribune)

Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta is refreshingly frank, sometimes stunningly so, writes Trudy Rubin.

7. America's culture is coming apart at the seams (Chicago Tribune)

This may sound a little odd, but I believe that I need to pay more attention to white people, writes Clarence Page.

8. What Wikipedia Won't Tell You (New York Times)

Policy makers had recognized a constitutional (and economic) imperative to protect American property from theft, to shield consumers from counterfeit products and fraud, and to combat foreign criminals who exploit technology to steal American ingenuity and jobs, writes Carey H. Sherman.

9. 'Super' subliminal politics in Chrysler ad? (San Francisco Chronicle)

It would be hard to craft a more perfect soft-sell pitch for President Obama's re-election than Chrysler's "It's Halftime in America" Super Bowl spot featuring Clint Eastwood, argues this editorial.

10. Why Mitt Romney? He's ready to rebuild American success (Washington Times)

The time has come for the Republican Party to close the deal. I believe Mitt Romney is the best choice for the presidency, says Donald J. Trump.

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Stephen Hawking's enthusiasm for colonising space makes him almost as bad as Trump

The physicist's inistence on mankind's expansion risks making him a handmaiden of inequality.

“Spreading out may be the only thing that saves us from ourselves,” Stephen Hawking has warned. And he’s not just talking about surviving the UK's recent run of record breaking heat. If humanity doesn’t start sending people to Mars soon, then in a few hundred years he says we can all expect to be kaput; there just isn’t enough space for us all.

The theoretical physicist gave his address to the glittering Starmus Festival of science and arts in Norway. According to the BBC, he argued that climate change and the depletion of natural resources help make space travel essential. With this in mind, he would like to see a mission to Mars by 2025 and a new lunar base within 30 years.

He even took a swipe at Donald Trump: “I am not denying the importance of fighting climate change and global warming, unlike Donald Trump, who may just have taken the most serious, and wrong, decision on climate change this world has seen.”

Yet there are striking similarities between Hawking's statement and the President's bombast. For one thing there was the context in which it was made - an address to a festival dripping with conspicuous consumption, where 18 carat gold OMEGA watches were dished out as prizes.

More importantly there's the inescapable reality that space colonisation is an inherently elitist affair: under Trump you may be able to pay your way out of earthly catastrophe, while for Elon Musk, brawn could be a deciding advantage, given he wants his early settlers on Mars to be able to dredge up buried ice.

Whichever way you divide it up, it is unlikely that everyone will be able to RightMove their way to a less crowded galaxy. Hell, most people can’t even make it to Starmus itself (€800  for a full price ticket), where the line-up of speakers is overwhelmingly white and male.

So while this obsession with space travel has a certain nobility, it also risks elevating earthly inequalities to an interplanetary scale.

And although Hawking is right to call out Trump on climate change, the concern that space travel diverts money from saving earth's ecosystems still stands. 

In a context where the American government is upping NASA’s budget for manned space flights at the same time as it cuts funds for critical work observing the changes on earth, it is imperative that the wider science community stands up against this worrying trend.

Hawking's enthusiasm for colonising the solar system risks playing into the hands of the those who share the President destructive views on the climate, at the expense of the planet underneath us.

India Bourke is an environment writer and editorial assistant at the New Statesman.

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