US press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. Memo to Mitt: The Safety Net Needs Fixing (Wall Street Journal)

Texas ranchers are saving exotic wildlife. Anti-hunting groups want to put them out of business says Alan S. Blinder.

2. Different liberal camps divide progressives (Washington Post)

Conservatives are getting the attention as they duke it out in this GOP primary season. But on a surprising range of issues, there's an important, if quieter, conflict between two progressive camps, wries Fred Hiatt.

3. Severe Conservative Syndrome (New York Times)

Mitt Romney has a gift for words -- self-destructive words, says Paul Krugman.

4. Barack Obama's religion problem (Politico)

I find disquieting parallels between the way Obama handled the recent dust-up with the Catholic Church and contraception and the Israeli-Palestinian peace process a year ago, when he talked about returning to pre-1967 borders, argues Martin Frost.

5. The Strange Career of Voter Suppression (New York Times)

The 2012 general election campaign is likely to be a fight for every last vote, which means that it will also be a fight over who gets to cast one, says Alexander Keyssar.

6. It's rough being the front-runner (Chicago Tribune)

Mitt Romney's recent losses to Rick Santorum in Colorado, Missouri and Minnesota revealed a truism that Romney might want to study -- but not too much! Says Kathleen Parker.

7. Super-PAC politics drags in the Obama campaign (Detroit Free Press)

t's a damned if you do or don't situation, but we'd really prefer President Barack Obama did not indulge the super-PAC madness unleashed by an awful 2009 Supreme Court decision, says Kurt Strazdins.

8. A positive grade for integration aid plan (Star Tribune)

Task force strikes good balance between support, accountability, says this editorial.

9. Our make-believe federal budget (Politico)

Many people inside the Washington Beltway will be pouring through President Barack Obama's Fiscal 2013 budget proposal to find out what he proposes to cut, what initiatives he plans to invest in and what new policies he might propose, writes David M. Walker.

10. Immigration, deportation -- and no right to return? (Los Angeles Times)

The Justice Department says that deported immigrants who win their cases on appeal can return to the U.S. But it appears that's not true, says this editorial.

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“Trembling, shaking / Oh, my heart is aching”: the EU out campaign song will give you chills

But not in a good way.

You know the story. Some old guys with vague dreams of empire want Britain to leave the European Union. They’ve been kicking up such a big fuss over the past few years that the government is letting the public decide.

And what is it that sways a largely politically indifferent electorate? Strikes hope in their hearts for a mildly less bureaucratic yet dangerously human rights-free future? An anthem, of course!

Originally by Carly You’re so Vain Simon, this is the song the Leave.EU campaign (Nigel Farage’s chosen group) has chosen. It is performed by the singer Antonia Suñer, for whom freedom from the technofederalists couldn’t come any suñer.

Here are the lyrics, of which your mole has done a close reading. But essentially it’s just nature imagery with fascist undertones and some heartburn.

"Let the river run

"Let all the dreamers

"Wake the nation.

"Come, the new Jerusalem."

Don’t use a river metaphor in anything political, unless you actively want to evoke Enoch Powell. Also, Jerusalem? That’s a bit... strong, isn’t it? Heavy connotations of being a little bit too Englandy.

"Silver cities rise,

"The morning lights,

"The streets that meet them,

"And sirens call them on

"With a song."

Sirens and streets. Doesn’t sound like a wholly un-authoritarian view of the UK’s EU-free future to me.

"It’s asking for the taking,

"Trembling, shaking,

"Oh, my heart is aching."

A reference to the elderly nature of many of the UK’s eurosceptics, perhaps?

"We’re coming to the edge,

"Running on the water,

"Coming through the fog,

"Your sons and daughters."

I feel like this is something to do with the hosepipe ban.

"We the great and small,

"Stand on a star,

"And blaze a trail of desire,

"Through the dark’ning dawn."

Everyone will have to speak this kind of English in the new Jerusalem, m'lady, oft with shorten’d words which will leave you feeling cringéd.

"It’s asking for the taking.

"Come run with me now,

"The sky is the colour of blue,

"You’ve never even seen,

"In the eyes of your lover."

I think this means: no one has ever loved anyone with the same colour eyes as the EU flag.

I'm a mole, innit.