US Press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. Obama's recess appointment challenge (Los Angeles Times)

This editorial argues that the appointment of Richard Cordray pushes the edge of the constitutional envelope. But it's a rational response to an increasingly gridlocked Congress.

2. Washington Isn't Spending Too Much (Wall Street Journal) ($)

It's normal for deficits to rise during a downturn.The real fiscal challenge is decades down the road, Austan Goolsbee argues.

3. The Affordable Care Act, helping Americans curb health-care costs (Washington Post)

If health-care costs continue to rise unchecked, they will threaten America's ability to compete and will become unaffordable for most families, writes Kathleen Sebelius.

4. Positively Newt (New York Times)

Gingrich tried it for a while. So did John McCain. Will a presidential candidate ever be able to forego negative campaigning? Dan Schnur explores.

5. Reining in those pesky protesters (Chicago Tribune)

Marilyn Katz looks at the ironies of history and lessons for the future.

6. Election officers who block the vote (Politico)

Many secretaries of state used their office last year to throw doubt on the election system, Robert M. Brandon looks at why.

7. Moving America toward Europe's excess (Washington Times)

This editorial discusses why transportation policies are increasing government dependency.

8. Catnip from the progressive egotists (Washington Examiner)

An underlying theme of our times that has gone unperceived by the high and mighty in media, writes Emmett Tyrrell.

9. One war at a time (Washington Post)

Michael O'Hanlon explores why a one-war posture for the U.S. military will work.

10. Bain, Barack and Jobs (New York Times)

Mitt Romney says that President Obama has been a job destroyer, while he was a job-creating businessman. But those claims border on dishonesty, Paul Krugman writes.

Getty.
Show Hide image

Austria’s far-right presidential candidate Norbert Hofer concedes defeat

The vote was seen as a test of how other populist, anti-establishment candidates might perform in elections across Europe next year.

 

In an unexpected early result, Austria’s far-right party has conceded defeat in the country’s presidential election. The loss of the Freedom Party’s candidate Norbet Hofer to the liberal, Green Party-backed independent Alexander Van der Bellen, will be seen as a setback for the populist, Eurosceptic cause across Europe.

The official result of this bitterly fought election is unlikely to be confirmed before Monday, but the poll projections show a definitive victory for Van der Bellen. The projections had put Van der Bellen on 53.6% ahead of Hofer on 46.4%.

Hofer acknowledged his loss shortly after voting closed and congratulated his opponent. “I am infinitely sad that it didn't work out, I would have liked to watch over our Austria,” he wrote in a post on his Facebook page.

Hofer was aiming to become the first far-right leader in the European Union. Opinion polls in the run-up to today’s vote suggested the candidates were neck and neck.

His victory would have emboldened other far-right movements across Europe, such as Marine Le’s Pen’s Front National, further eroding the European liberal consensus. It would have been a shock of a similar scale to the Brexit vote and Donald Trump’s victory in the US presidential race.

The election was originally won by Van der Bellen back in May, but Austria’s supreme court demanded a re-run after voting irregularities emerged during the count. Van der Bellen now looks set to increase his victory of 31,000 votes by a factor of ten.

Hofer, one of the deputy presidents in Austria’s parliament, campaigned for the presidency on an anti-immigration platform. He attacked the government over its decision to allow 90,000 refugees and migrants to enter the country last year.

He had also appeared to suggest Austria could become the next nation to follow Britain out of the EU, with a referendum on its membership of the bloc. He later ruled that out, but stated that he would oppose Turkey’s bid for membership and further centralisation.

While the post of president is largely ceremonial, the vote had heightened significance as an indication of how well other populist candidates might perform in the forthcoming presidential and parliamentary elections across France, Germany and the Netherlands.

Serena Kutchinsky is the digital editor of the New Statesman.