Michele Bachmann suspends her campaign

The candidate described by <em>Rolling Stone</em> as "late-stage Kim Jong-Il crazy" withdraws after

Although she won the Iowa straw poll, Michele Bachmann has announced that she will "suspend her campaign" to become president of the US after a poor performance in the Iowa caucus. She finished last of the six candidates who seriously competed in the caucus. Despite previously indicating she'd stay in the race even if she didn't win in Iowa, she has withdrawn, saying:

Last night, the people of Iowa spoke with a very clear voice, and so I have decided to stand aside.

In her statement, she did not endorse any remaining candidate, but reiterated her criticism of Barack Obama and his healthcare programme, saying (in a sentence bound to amuse those of us with any sense of the definition of "socialism"):

I will continue to fight to defeat the president's agenda of socialism.

Bachmann's withdrawal is no surprise. Her campaign -- after an initial burst of success -- was quickly marred by a series of gaffes and a flimsy grasp of the facts.

Back in May, Matt Taibbi wrote a profile of Bachmann for Rolling Stone, in which he summed up the reasons why he thought she might just win:

Bachmann is exactly the right kind of completely batshit crazy. Not medically crazy, not talking-to-herself-on-the-subway crazy, but grandiose crazy, late-stage Kim Jong-Il crazy -- crazy in the sense that she's living completely inside her own mind, frenetically pacing the hallways of a vast sand castle she's built in there, unable to meaningfully communicate with the human beings on the other side of the moat, who are all presumed to be enemies.

Republicans can be grateful she is no longer in the running -- although her selection may have been a blessing for Obama.

UPDATE: Rick Perry has tweeted that he will be staying in the contest: "And the next leg of the marathon is the Palmetto State...Here we come South Carolina!!!"

Samira Shackle is a freelance journalist, who tweets @samirashackle. She was formerly a staff writer for the New Statesman.

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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Boris Johnson as Foreign Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs.

The world shared a stunned silence when news broke that Boris Johnson would be the new Foreign Secretary. Johnson, who once referred to black people as “piccaninnies” and more recently accused the half-Kenyan President of the United States of only commenting on the EU referendum because of bitterness about colonialism, will now be Britain’s representative on the world stage.

His colourful career immediately came back to haunt him when US journalists accused him of “outright lies” and reminded him of the time he likened Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton to a “sadistic nurse”. Johnson’s previous appearances on the international stage include a speech in Beijing where he maintained that ping pong was actually the Victorian game of “whiff whaff”.

But Johnson has always been more than a blond buffoon, and this appointment is a shrewd one by May. His popularity in the country at large, apparently helped by getting stuck on a zip line and having numerous affairs, made him an obvious threat to David Cameron’s premiership. His decision to defect to the Leave campaign was widely credited with bringing it success. He canned his leadership campaign after Michael Gove launched his own bid, but the question of whether his chutzpah would beat May’s experience and gravity is still unknown.

In giving BoJo the Foreign Office, then, May hands him the photo opportunities he craves. Meanwhile, the man with real power in international affairs will be David Davis, who as Brexit minister has the far more daunting task of renegotiating Britain’s trade deals.