US politics from outside the beltway

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US Press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. Romney, an executive in chief? (Los Angeles Times)

Does experience in the business world really make for a better president? History suggests there's no link, argues Walter Zelman.

2. 'Buffett Tax' and truth in numbers (Washington Post)

Whatever else they are, the super-rich have now become political props, says Robert J. Samuelson.

3. How conservatives lost their moral compass (Politico)

Over the past 40 years, as conservatives have complained, this nation has undergone a moral revolution. It's just not the one they think, writes Neal Gabler.

4. A Mormon church in need of reform (Washington Post)

The church's distrust of outsiders, dissidents must end, says Carrie Sheffield.

5. Apple, not manufacturing, is America's future (Boston Globe) (£)

If we want the next technological revolution to start here, politicians need to change their industrial-age view, argues John E. Sununu.

6. New Strategy, Old Pentagon Budget (New York Times)

The cuts in the Pentagon's spending are not cuts at all, just Washington budget games, says this editorial.

7. RomneyCare and ObamaCare (Wall Street Journal)

Mitt Romney's vulnerability on health care may not cost him the nomination, but it could cost him in November, writes Paul Gigot.

8. Is compassionate conservatism dead? (USA Today)

The Republican presidential candidates competing for the affections of Florida voters have plenty of labels with which to tar each other, says Amy Sullivan.

9. Gingrich's link to Reagan comes under scrutiny (San Francisco Chronicle)

No Republican has claimed the mantle of the late president, former California governor and GOP icon Ronald Reagan with more unabashed relish than former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, says Carolyn Lochead.

10. The Austerity Debacle (New York Times)

In Britain and elsewhere, the policy elite decided to throw that hard-won knowledge out the window, and rely on ideologically convenient wishful thinking instead, writes Paul Krugman.