US Press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. Indefinite detention violates American values (San Francisco Chronicle)

Compromise is part of the political process, but the foundational principles of this nation should not be tendered as the cost of passing a bill about national defense, this editorial argues.

2. Can I vote for a Mormon? (Washington Post)

Ken Starr argues that the Constitution, not faith, matters.

3. My Baloney Has a First Name, It's M-I-T-T (Slate)

Will Newt Gingrich's attack on Mitt Romney's "pious baloney" change the New Hampshire race? John Dickerson discusses.

4. Holder's Texas Intrusion (Wall Street Journal) ($)

The Supreme Court will rule on a racial redistricting ploy. This review investigates.

5. Talking to the Taliban (Los Angeles Times)

As the insurgents say, the U.S. has the watches but the Taliban has the time. Rajan Menon writes about the "new phase in a long struggle".

6. Drug-testing proposal discriminates against poor (Detroit Free Press)

More than a decade after courts wisely rejected Michigan's efforts to drug-test welfare recipients, state legislators are considering a new version of this discriminatory practice, this editorial writes.

7. Can U.S. adjust to Islamist Mideast? (Politico)

William B. Quandt writes that whoever is president in 2013 will want to have good relations with Turkey and Egypt.

8. Just the Ticket (New York Times)

Why Hillary Clinton is the answer. Seriously, writes Bill Keller.

9. Republicans Versus Reproductive Rights (New York Times)

Voters should not be fooled. The assault on women's reproductive health is a central part of the Republican agenda, this editorial warns.

10. Why should Prop. 13 be sacrosanct? (Los Angeles Times)

According to Jim Newton, the core provisions of Proposition 13 remain weirdly off-limits to normal political debate. It's time for that to end.

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“Trembling, shaking / Oh, my heart is aching”: the EU out campaign song will give you chills

But not in a good way.

You know the story. Some old guys with vague dreams of empire want Britain to leave the European Union. They’ve been kicking up such a big fuss over the past few years that the government is letting the public decide.

And what is it that sways a largely politically indifferent electorate? Strikes hope in their hearts for a mildly less bureaucratic yet dangerously human rights-free future? An anthem, of course!

Originally by Carly You’re so Vain Simon, this is the song the Leave.EU campaign (Nigel Farage’s chosen group) has chosen. It is performed by the singer Antonia Suñer, for whom freedom from the technofederalists couldn’t come any suñer.

Here are the lyrics, of which your mole has done a close reading. But essentially it’s just nature imagery with fascist undertones and some heartburn.

"Let the river run

"Let all the dreamers

"Wake the nation.

"Come, the new Jerusalem."

Don’t use a river metaphor in anything political, unless you actively want to evoke Enoch Powell. Also, Jerusalem? That’s a bit... strong, isn’t it? Heavy connotations of being a little bit too Englandy.

"Silver cities rise,

"The morning lights,

"The streets that meet them,

"And sirens call them on

"With a song."

Sirens and streets. Doesn’t sound like a wholly un-authoritarian of the UK’s EU-free future to me.

"It’s asking for the taking,

"Trembling, shaking,

"Oh, my heart is aching."

A reference to the elderly nature of many of the UK’s eurosceptics, perhaps?

"We’re coming to the edge,

"Running on the water,

"Coming through the fog,

"Your sons and daughters."

I feel like this is something to do with the hosepipe ban.

"We the great and small,

"Stand on a star,

"And blaze a trail of desire,

"Through the dark’ning dawn."

Everyone will have to speak this kind of English in the new Jerusalem, m'lady, oft with shorten’d words which will leave you feeling cringéd.

"It’s asking for the taking.

"Come run with me now,

"The sky is the colour of blue,

"You’ve never even seen,

"In the eyes of your lover."

I think this means: no one has ever loved anyone with the same colour eyes as the EU flag.

I'm a mole, innit.