US Press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. Indefinite detention violates American values (San Francisco Chronicle)

Compromise is part of the political process, but the foundational principles of this nation should not be tendered as the cost of passing a bill about national defense, this editorial argues.

2. Can I vote for a Mormon? (Washington Post)

Ken Starr argues that the Constitution, not faith, matters.

3. My Baloney Has a First Name, It's M-I-T-T (Slate)

Will Newt Gingrich's attack on Mitt Romney's "pious baloney" change the New Hampshire race? John Dickerson discusses.

4. Holder's Texas Intrusion (Wall Street Journal) ($)

The Supreme Court will rule on a racial redistricting ploy. This review investigates.

5. Talking to the Taliban (Los Angeles Times)

As the insurgents say, the U.S. has the watches but the Taliban has the time. Rajan Menon writes about the "new phase in a long struggle".

6. Drug-testing proposal discriminates against poor (Detroit Free Press)

More than a decade after courts wisely rejected Michigan's efforts to drug-test welfare recipients, state legislators are considering a new version of this discriminatory practice, this editorial writes.

7. Can U.S. adjust to Islamist Mideast? (Politico)

William B. Quandt writes that whoever is president in 2013 will want to have good relations with Turkey and Egypt.

8. Just the Ticket (New York Times)

Why Hillary Clinton is the answer. Seriously, writes Bill Keller.

9. Republicans Versus Reproductive Rights (New York Times)

Voters should not be fooled. The assault on women's reproductive health is a central part of the Republican agenda, this editorial warns.

10. Why should Prop. 13 be sacrosanct? (Los Angeles Times)

According to Jim Newton, the core provisions of Proposition 13 remain weirdly off-limits to normal political debate. It's time for that to end.

Photo: Getty
Show Hide image

What does François Bayrou's endorsement of Emmanuel Macron mean for the French presidential race?

The support of the perennial candidate for President will boost Macron's morale but won't transform his electoral standing. 

François Bayrou, the leader of the centrist Democratic Movement and a candidate for the French presidency in 2007 and 2012, has endorsed Emmanuel Macron’s bid for the presidency.

What does it mean for the presidential race?  Under the rules of the French electoral system, if no candidate secures more than half the vote in the first round, the top two go through to a run-off.

Since 2013, Marine Le Pen has consistently led in the first round before going down to defeat in the second, regardless of the identity of her opponents, according to the polls.

However, national crises – such as terror attacks or the recent riots following the brutal arrest of a 22-year-old black man, who was sodomised with a police baton – do result in a boost for Le Pen’s standing, as does the ongoing “Penelopegate” scandal about the finances of the centre-right candidate, François Fillon.

Macron performs the most strongly of any candidate in the second round but struggles to make it into the top two in the first. Having eked out a clear lead in second place ahead of Fillon in the wake of Penelopegate, Macron’s lead has fallen back in recent polls after he said that France’s rule in Algeria was a “crime against humanity”.

Although polls show that the lion’s share of Bayrou’s supporters flow to Macron without his presence in the race, with the rest going to Fillon and Le Pen, Macron’s standing has remained unchanged regardless of whether or not Bayrou is in the race or not. So as far as the electoral battlefield is concerned, Bayrou’s decision is not a gamechanger.

But the institutional support of the Democratic Movement will add to the ability of Macron’s new party, En Marche, to get its voters to the polls on election day, though the Democratic Movement has never won a vast number of deputies or regional elections. It will further add to the good news for Macron following a successful visit to London this week, and, his supporters will hope, will transform the mood music around his campaign.

But hopes that a similar pact between Benoît Hamon, the Socialist Party candidate, and Jean-Luc Jean-Luc Mélenchon, the Left Front’s candidate, look increasingly slim, after Mélenchon said that joining up with the Socialists would be like “hanging himself to a hearse”. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.