US Press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. A House Divided (Wall Street Journal) ($)

Daniel Henninger argues that the divider of the Republican party is its front-runner, Mitt Romney.

2. The danger in a declining middle class (Washington Post)

Globalization erodes democracy's anchor, according to David Ignatius.

3. Sexual accusation: The shame that lingers (Detriot Free Press)

'In an age when explicit sexual imagery is more pervasive than ever, the allegation that a person has engaged in any kind of sexual impropriety remains almost uniquely damaging.' Brian Dickerson discusses.

4. Face It: Romney's the Nominee (Slate)

Jacob Weisberg warns that the media will desperately try to persuade you there is still a Republican race.

5. Is the tea party over? (Los Angeles Times)

Not exactly, writes Doyle McManus. The tea party has changed the political landscape in ways that are likely to last for a while. But its least favorite candidate, Mitt Romney, just came up big in Iowa.

6. Security vs. scourge (The Boston Globe) ($)

Scientists mutate a deadly virus. Should the details be published? Juliette Kayyem discusses.

7. Progress in wake of San Bruno pipeline tragedy (San Francisco Chronicle)

Thousands of miles of pipeline face more inspections and higher fines for safety lapses

8. Tax-haven wars (Washington Times)

Congress is scheming to export IRS meddling overseas, this editorial reveals.

9. Hailing the Wrong Taxi (New York Times)

The plan to retrofit taxis to make them wheelchair accessible is expensive and inefficient. There's a better way, Matthew W. Daus argues.

10. Ron Paul, still loony (Salon)

Even when the Texas congressman is right on an issue, it's for the wrong reasons, writes Gene Lyons.

BBC
Show Hide image

“Why are you here?”: Juncker and MEPs mock Nigel Farage at the European Parliament

Returning to the scene of the crime.

In today's European Parliament session, Jean-Claude Juncker, president of the European Commission, tried his best to keep things cordial during a debate on Brexit. He asked MEPs to "respect British democracy and the way it voiced its view".

Unfortunately, Nigel Farage, UKIP leader and MEP, felt it necessary to voice his view a little more by applauding - the last straw even for Juncker, who turned and spat: "That's the last time you are applauding here." 

MEPs laughed and clapped, and he continued: "I am surprised you are here. You are fighting for the exit. The British people voted in f avour of the exit. Why are you here?"  

Watch the exchange here:

Farage responded with an impromptu speech, in which he pointed out that MEPs laughed when he first planned to campaign for Britain to leave the EU: "Well, you're not laughing now". Hee said the EU was in "denial" and that its project had "failed".

MPs booed again.

He continued:

"Because what the little people did, what the ordinary people did – what the people who’d been oppressed over the last few years who’d seen their living standards go down did – was they rejected the multinationals, they rejected the merchant banks, they rejected big politics and they said actually, we want our country back, we want our fishing waters back, we want our borders back. 

"We want to be an independent, self-governing, normal nation. That is what we have done and that is what must happen. In doing so we now offer a beacon of hope to democrats across the rest of the European continent. I’ll make one prediction this morning: the United Kingdom will not be the last member state to leave the European Union."

The Independent has a full transcript of the speech.

Now, it sounds like Farage had something prepared – so it's no wonder he turned up in Brussels for this important task today, while Brexiteers in Britain frantically try to put together a plan for leaving the EU.

But your mole has to wonder if perhaps, in the face of a falling British pound and a party whose major source of income is MEP salaries and expenses, Farage is less willing to give up his cushy European job than he might like us to think. 

I'm a mole, innit.