US Press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. Bush tax cuts helped the rich get richer (Washington Post)

While few question the fact that income inequality has risen in the United States over the past three decades, there is plenty of dispute about why, argues this editorial.

2. Time Running Out for Romney's Rivals (New York Times)

The five remaining candidates in the race emerged from Monday night's fast-paced, tough-talking debate in Myrtle Beach much the way they went in, says Michael D. Shear.

3. Partisan Washington: Obama's broken promise (Politico)

Obama's failure to fulfill this central claim of his 2008 campaign has never been more glaringly obvious, write Carrie Budoff Brown and Jonathan Allen.

4. ECB Seeks Plan B (Wall Street Journal)

The European Central Bank is looking for a possible alternative to its current bond-buying program, write Hans Bentzien and Nicole Lundeen.

5. Romney endures battering in South Carolina (Los Angeles Times)

Mitt Romney was repeatedly put on the defensive over his business and government record, say Paul West and Seema Mehta.

6. Rick Perry stands by defense of Marines shown urinating on Taliban (Chicago Tribune)

Rick Perry criticises the administration's response to a video showing Marines urinating on Taliban bodie, according to John Hoeffel.

7. The GOP debate in South Carolina: 8 takeaways (Politico)

After a raucous debate in Myrtle Beach, S. C., the front-runner emerged with some bruises but his dignity and, more important, his status intact, says Maggie Haberman.

8. China's economy grows at slowest rate in more than two years (Los Angeles Times)

In the final quarter of 2011, China's economy grew at its slowest pace in 2½ years, according to David Pierson.

9. Serial killing suspect's life unraveled after Iraq (Los Angeles Times)

Itzcoatl 'Izzy' Ocampo once helped the homeless and was a gung-ho Marine, but friends and family say he suffered hallucinations after leaving the service, says Louis Sahagun and Christopher Goffard.

10. Most in poll think Romney will clinch GOP nomination (Washington Post)

Mitt Romney holds a strong lead nationally in the race for the Republican presidential nomination, write Dan Balz and Jon Cohen.

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Hate Brexit Britain? 7 of the best places for political progressives to emigrate to

If you don't think you're going to get your country back, time to find another. 

Never mind the European Union, the UK is so over. Scotland's drifting off one way, Northern Ireland another and middle England is busy setting the clocks back to 1973. 

If this is what you're thinking as you absentmindedly down the last of your cheap, import-free red wine, then maybe it's time to move abroad. 

There are wonderful Himalayan mountain kingdoms like Bhutan, but unfortunately foreigners have to pay $250 a day. And there are great post-colonial states like India and South Africa, but there are also some post-colonial problems as well. So bearing things like needing a job in mind, it might be better to consider these options instead: 

1. Canada

If you’re sick of Little England, why not move to Canada? It's the world's second-biggest country with half the UK's population, and immigrants are welcomed as ‘new Canadians’. Oh, and a hot, feminist Prime Minister.

Justin Trudeau's Cabinet has equal numbers of men and women, and includes a former Afghan refugee. He's also personally greeted Syrian refugees to the country. 

2. New Zealand 

With its practice of diverting asylum seekers to poor, inhospitable islands, Australia may be a Brexiteer's dream. But not far away is kindly New Zealand, with a moderate multi-party government and lots of Greens. It was also the first country to have an openly transexual mayor. 

Same-sex marriage has been legal in New Zealand since 2013, and sexual discrimination is illegal. But more importantly, you can live out your own Lord of the Rings movie again and again. As they say, one referendum to rule them all and in the darkness bind them...

3. Scandinavia

The Scandinavian countries regularly top the world’s quality of life indices. They’re also known for progressive policies, like equal parental leave for mothers and fathers. 

Norway ranks no. 2 of all the OECD countries for jobs and life satisfaction, Finland’s no.1 for education, Sweden stands out for health care and Denmark’s no. 1 for work-life balance. And the crime dramas are great.

Until 24 June, as an EU citizen, you could have moved there at the drop of a hat. Now you'll need to keep an eye on the negotiations. 

4. Scotland

Scottish voters bucked the trend and voted overwhelmingly to stay in the European Union. Not only is the First Minister of the Scottish Parliament a woman, but 35% of MSPs are women, compared to 29% of MPs.

If you're attached to this rainy isle but you don't want to give up the European dream, catch a train north. Just be prepared to stomach yet another referendum before you claw back that EU passport. 

5. Germany

The real giant of Europe, Germany is home to avant-garde artists, refugee activists and also has a lot of jobs (time to get that GCSE German textbook out again). And its leader is the most powerful woman in the world, Angela Merkel. 

Greeks may hate her, but Merkel has undoubtedly been a crusader for moderate politics in the face of populist right movements. 

6. Ireland

It's English speaking, has a history of revolutionary politics and there's always a Ryanair flight. Progressives though may want to think twice before boarding though. Despite legalising same-sex marriage, Catholic Ireland has some of the strictest abortion laws of the western world. 

A happier solution may be to find out if you have any Irish grandparents (you might be surprised) and apply for an Irish passport. At least then you have an escape route.

7. Vermont, USA

Let's be clear, anywhere that is considering a President Trump is not a progressive country. But under the Obama administration, it has made great strides in healthcare, gay marriage and more. If you felt the Bern, why not head off to Bernie Sanders' home state of Vermont?

And thanks to the US political system, you can still legally smoke cannabis (for medicinal reasons, of course) in states like Colorado.