US Press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. Bush tax cuts helped the rich get richer (Washington Post)

While few question the fact that income inequality has risen in the United States over the past three decades, there is plenty of dispute about why, argues this editorial.

2. Time Running Out for Romney's Rivals (New York Times)

The five remaining candidates in the race emerged from Monday night's fast-paced, tough-talking debate in Myrtle Beach much the way they went in, says Michael D. Shear.

3. Partisan Washington: Obama's broken promise (Politico)

Obama's failure to fulfill this central claim of his 2008 campaign has never been more glaringly obvious, write Carrie Budoff Brown and Jonathan Allen.

4. ECB Seeks Plan B (Wall Street Journal)

The European Central Bank is looking for a possible alternative to its current bond-buying program, write Hans Bentzien and Nicole Lundeen.

5. Romney endures battering in South Carolina (Los Angeles Times)

Mitt Romney was repeatedly put on the defensive over his business and government record, say Paul West and Seema Mehta.

6. Rick Perry stands by defense of Marines shown urinating on Taliban (Chicago Tribune)

Rick Perry criticises the administration's response to a video showing Marines urinating on Taliban bodie, according to John Hoeffel.

7. The GOP debate in South Carolina: 8 takeaways (Politico)

After a raucous debate in Myrtle Beach, S. C., the front-runner emerged with some bruises but his dignity and, more important, his status intact, says Maggie Haberman.

8. China's economy grows at slowest rate in more than two years (Los Angeles Times)

In the final quarter of 2011, China's economy grew at its slowest pace in 2½ years, according to David Pierson.

9. Serial killing suspect's life unraveled after Iraq (Los Angeles Times)

Itzcoatl 'Izzy' Ocampo once helped the homeless and was a gung-ho Marine, but friends and family say he suffered hallucinations after leaving the service, says Louis Sahagun and Christopher Goffard.

10. Most in poll think Romney will clinch GOP nomination (Washington Post)

Mitt Romney holds a strong lead nationally in the race for the Republican presidential nomination, write Dan Balz and Jon Cohen.

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Emmanuel Macron's "moralisation of politics" comes at a heavy price for his allies

"Fake" jobs in French politics, season 3 episode 1.

Something is rotten in the state of France. No political party – at least none that existed before 2016 – seems immune to the spread of investigations into “fake” or shady parliamentary jobs. The accusations sank centre-right candidate François Fillon’s presidential campaign, and led to Marine Le Pen losing her parliamentary immunity in the European parliament (and proxy wars within her party, the National Front). Both deny the allegations. Now the investigations have made their way to the French government, led by Edouard Philippe, Emmanuel Macron’s Prime Minister.

On Wednesday morning, justice minister François Bayrou and secretary of state for European affairs Marielle de Sarnez announced their resignation from Philippe’s cabinet. They followed defence minister Sylvie Goulard’s resignation the previous day. The three politicians belonged not to Macron's party, En Marche!, but the centrist MoDem party. Bayrou, the leader, had thrown his weight behind Macron after dropping his own presidential bid in April.

The disappearance of three ministers leaves Emmanuel Macron’s cross-party government, which includes politicians from centre left and centre right parties, without a centrist helm. (Bayrou, who has run several times for the French presidency and lost, is the original “neither left nor right” politician – just with a less disruptive attitude, and a lot less luck). “I have decided not to be part of the next government,” he told the AFP.

Rumours had been spreading for weeks. Bayrou, who was last part of a French government as education minister from 1993 to 1997, had been under pressure since 9 June, when he was included in a preliminary investigation into “embezzlement”. The case revolves around whether the parliamentary assistants of MoDem's MEPs, paid for by the European Parliament, were actually working full or part-time for the party. The other two MoDem ministers who resigned, along with Bayrou, also have assistants under investigation.

Bayrou has denied the allegations. He has declared that there “never was” any case of “fake” jobs within his party and that it would be “easy to prove”. All the same, by the time he resigned, his position as justice minister has become untenable, not least because he was tasked by Macron with developing key legislation on the “moralisation of politics”, one of the new President’s campaign pledges. On 1 June, Bayrou unveiled the new law, which plans a 10-year ban from public life for any politician convicted of a crime or offence regarding honesty and transparency in their work.

Bayrou described his decision to resign as a sacrifice. “My name was never pronounced, but I was the target to hit to attack the government’s credibility,” he said, declaring he would rather “protect this law” by stepping down. The other two ministers also refuted the allegations, and gave similar reasons for resigning. 

Macron’s movement-turned-unstoppable-machine, En Marche!, remains untainted from accusations of the sort. Their 350 new MPs are younger, more diverse than is usual in France – but they are newcomers in politics. Which is exactly why Macron had sought an alliance with experienced Bayrou in the first place.

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