US Press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. Bush tax cuts helped the rich get richer (Washington Post)

While few question the fact that income inequality has risen in the United States over the past three decades, there is plenty of dispute about why, argues this editorial.

2. Time Running Out for Romney's Rivals (New York Times)

The five remaining candidates in the race emerged from Monday night's fast-paced, tough-talking debate in Myrtle Beach much the way they went in, says Michael D. Shear.

3. Partisan Washington: Obama's broken promise (Politico)

Obama's failure to fulfill this central claim of his 2008 campaign has never been more glaringly obvious, write Carrie Budoff Brown and Jonathan Allen.

4. ECB Seeks Plan B (Wall Street Journal)

The European Central Bank is looking for a possible alternative to its current bond-buying program, write Hans Bentzien and Nicole Lundeen.

5. Romney endures battering in South Carolina (Los Angeles Times)

Mitt Romney was repeatedly put on the defensive over his business and government record, say Paul West and Seema Mehta.

6. Rick Perry stands by defense of Marines shown urinating on Taliban (Chicago Tribune)

Rick Perry criticises the administration's response to a video showing Marines urinating on Taliban bodie, according to John Hoeffel.

7. The GOP debate in South Carolina: 8 takeaways (Politico)

After a raucous debate in Myrtle Beach, S. C., the front-runner emerged with some bruises but his dignity and, more important, his status intact, says Maggie Haberman.

8. China's economy grows at slowest rate in more than two years (Los Angeles Times)

In the final quarter of 2011, China's economy grew at its slowest pace in 2½ years, according to David Pierson.

9. Serial killing suspect's life unraveled after Iraq (Los Angeles Times)

Itzcoatl 'Izzy' Ocampo once helped the homeless and was a gung-ho Marine, but friends and family say he suffered hallucinations after leaving the service, says Louis Sahagun and Christopher Goffard.

10. Most in poll think Romney will clinch GOP nomination (Washington Post)

Mitt Romney holds a strong lead nationally in the race for the Republican presidential nomination, write Dan Balz and Jon Cohen.

Photo: Getty
Show Hide image

What does François Bayrou's endorsement of Emmanuel Macron mean for the French presidential race?

The support of the perennial candidate for President will boost Macron's morale but won't transform his electoral standing. 

François Bayrou, the leader of the centrist Democratic Movement and a candidate for the French presidency in 2007 and 2012, has endorsed Emmanuel Macron’s bid for the presidency.

What does it mean for the presidential race?  Under the rules of the French electoral system, if no candidate secures more than half the vote in the first round, the top two go through to a run-off.

Since 2013, Marine Le Pen has consistently led in the first round before going down to defeat in the second, regardless of the identity of her opponents, according to the polls.

However, national crises – such as terror attacks or the recent riots following the brutal arrest of a 22-year-old black man, who was sodomised with a police baton – do result in a boost for Le Pen’s standing, as does the ongoing “Penelopegate” scandal about the finances of the centre-right candidate, François Fillon.

Macron performs the most strongly of any candidate in the second round but struggles to make it into the top two in the first. Having eked out a clear lead in second place ahead of Fillon in the wake of Penelopegate, Macron’s lead has fallen back in recent polls after he said that France’s rule in Algeria was a “crime against humanity”.

Although polls show that the lion’s share of Bayrou’s supporters flow to Macron without his presence in the race, with the rest going to Fillon and Le Pen, Macron’s standing has remained unchanged regardless of whether or not Bayrou is in the race or not. So as far as the electoral battlefield is concerned, Bayrou’s decision is not a gamechanger.

But the institutional support of the Democratic Movement will add to the ability of Macron’s new party, En Marche, to get its voters to the polls on election day, though the Democratic Movement has never won a vast number of deputies or regional elections. It will further add to the good news for Macron following a successful visit to London this week, and, his supporters will hope, will transform the mood music around his campaign.

But hopes that a similar pact between Benoît Hamon, the Socialist Party candidate, and Jean-Luc Jean-Luc Mélenchon, the Left Front’s candidate, look increasingly slim, after Mélenchon said that joining up with the Socialists would be like “hanging himself to a hearse”. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.