US Press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. Last chance on mortgage mess (Poliltico)

The financial sector has been the Obama administration's Achilles' heel, writes Simon Johnson.

2. Time to bring back Bill Clinton (Washington Post)

If Republicans are yet again tempted by Newt Gingrich, then Democrats must bring back his nemesis Bill Clinton, writes David Maraniss.

3. Government, big or small (Los Angeles Times)

Presidents from Nixon to Obama have promised to streamline government, but in truth they've usually found uses for government power instead, says Brent Cebul.

4. For GOP candidates, 10 questions from Florida (Tampa Bay Times)

The Republicans should be able to answer 10 questions ahead of the Florida primary, according to this editorial.

5. The war on political free speech (Wall Street Journal) (£)

Two years after the US Supreme Court's Citizens United ruling, the campaign to silence opponents is becoming more censorious, says Bradley Smith.

6. Why we will no longer endorse in elections (Chicago Sun Times)

The Chicago Sun-Times Editorial Board will approach election coverage in a new way, according to this editorial.

7. The GOP's final four face an impulsive electorate (USA Today)

Eight days remain before a very different test in Florida, a far larger state where voters aren't the same mix of conservative evangelicals who dominate in South Carolina, says this editorial.

8. 'Reformer' Gingrich embodies what is wrong with Washington (Washington Examiner)

Gingrich exemplifies what is wrong with Washington in both parties -- professional politicians say all the right things, but they keep doing the wrong things, this editorial argues.

9.Is our economy healing? (New York Times) (£)

There is a case for modest optimism when it comes to the economy, writes Paul Krugman.

10.Warning: this site contains conspiracy theories (Slate)

Google has a responsibility to help stop "fringe beliefs" such as 9/11 denialism which should be given a "socially responsible curated treatment" , argues Evgeny Morozov.

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Turkey's turmoil should worry David Cameron

Splits in the Turkish government could play into the Brexiteers' hands.

While Britain focused on Sadiq v Zac and Cameron v Corbyn, in Turkey an even more dramatic contest was coming to a head. For weeks there has been growing speculation about a split between Ahmet Davutoğlu, the wonkish prime minster, and President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, the macho, mercurial kingpin of Turkish politics. The two men have differed over a growing crackdown on freedom of expression, the conflict with Kurdish militants in Turkey’s south east and Erdoğan’s ambitions to strengthen his own power. Yesterday, a nervous-sounding Davutoğlu confirmed on live television that he would leave his post.

To outside observers, this might seem like a faraway power struggle between two men with unpronounceable names. But it matters for Britain and the impending EU referendum in two crucial ways.

1. It throws the EU-Turkey refugee deal into doubt

The controversial €6bn agreement to stem the flows to Europe was born of the strong relationship between Davutoğlu and German Chancellor Angela Merkel. Not only does President Erdoğan have a far more ambivalent attitude towards the EU. He has also made Merkel’s life difficult by demanding the prosecution of a German comedian who penned a crude poem about him.

Though much criticised, the EU-Turkey deal has dramatically reduced the numbers being smuggled by sea to Greece. If it collapses, Europe could be heading for a repeat of last year’s crisis, when more than 800,000 people arrived on Greek shores. In Britain, such scenes will only fuel concern about migration - a key driver of anti-EU sentiment.

2. It plays into the narrative of the Brexit camp

Brexiteers have already sought to use Erdoğan’s growing illiberalism - and Turkey’s aspirations to join the EU - to win people over to their side. Turkey’s “palace coup” (as the opposition newspaper Cumhuriyet called it) cements the image of Erdoğan as an all-powerful leader who will not tolerate dissent. The accusations against Turkey are often ill-informed and tinged with Islamophobia. But they are clearly seen as effective by both sides in the referendum campaign. Only this week, David Cameron was forced to distance himself from his previous enthusiasm for Turkish accession, insisting that the prospect would not be on the cards “for decades.”

For now, Erdoğan’s intentions towards the EU deal are unclear. Perhaps he would like to take credit for visa-free travel for Turkish citizens to the Schengen Zone (but not the UK) - an attractive perk promised in return for Turkey’s cooperation. But it is just as easy to imagine him watching it collapse before railing against the perfidious west.

Either way, there will be nerves in Brussels, Berlin and London. Diplomats see the president as a much more difficult partner than Davutoğlu. “Erdoğan has to be handled very carefully,” said one official. “If Jean-Claude Juncker says something too blunt, who knows what will happen?”

Turkey still has several hurdles to clear before visa-free travel is approved. Ankara has made clear that it will not hold up its end of the bargain if the promise is not fulfilled. With the deadline for implementation set for the last day in June, the deal could begin imploding towards the end of next month. That, David Cameron will surely note with a gulp, would be just in time for the EU referendum.