US Press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. Last chance on mortgage mess (Poliltico)

The financial sector has been the Obama administration's Achilles' heel, writes Simon Johnson.

2. Time to bring back Bill Clinton (Washington Post)

If Republicans are yet again tempted by Newt Gingrich, then Democrats must bring back his nemesis Bill Clinton, writes David Maraniss.

3. Government, big or small (Los Angeles Times)

Presidents from Nixon to Obama have promised to streamline government, but in truth they've usually found uses for government power instead, says Brent Cebul.

4. For GOP candidates, 10 questions from Florida (Tampa Bay Times)

The Republicans should be able to answer 10 questions ahead of the Florida primary, according to this editorial.

5. The war on political free speech (Wall Street Journal) (£)

Two years after the US Supreme Court's Citizens United ruling, the campaign to silence opponents is becoming more censorious, says Bradley Smith.

6. Why we will no longer endorse in elections (Chicago Sun Times)

The Chicago Sun-Times Editorial Board will approach election coverage in a new way, according to this editorial.

7. The GOP's final four face an impulsive electorate (USA Today)

Eight days remain before a very different test in Florida, a far larger state where voters aren't the same mix of conservative evangelicals who dominate in South Carolina, says this editorial.

8. 'Reformer' Gingrich embodies what is wrong with Washington (Washington Examiner)

Gingrich exemplifies what is wrong with Washington in both parties -- professional politicians say all the right things, but they keep doing the wrong things, this editorial argues.

9.Is our economy healing? (New York Times) (£)

There is a case for modest optimism when it comes to the economy, writes Paul Krugman.

10.Warning: this site contains conspiracy theories (Slate)

Google has a responsibility to help stop "fringe beliefs" such as 9/11 denialism which should be given a "socially responsible curated treatment" , argues Evgeny Morozov.

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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Boris Johnson as Foreign Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs.

The world shared a stunned silence when news broke that Boris Johnson would be the new Foreign Secretary. Johnson, who once referred to black people as “piccaninnies” and more recently accused the half-Kenyan President of the United States of only commenting on the EU referendum because of bitterness about colonialism, will now be Britain’s representative on the world stage.

His colourful career immediately came back to haunt him when US journalists accused him of “outright lies” and reminded him of the time he likened Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton to a “sadistic nurse”. Johnson’s previous appearances on the international stage include a speech in Beijing where he maintained that ping pong was actually the Victorian game of “whiff whaff”.

But Johnson has always been more than a blond buffoon, and this appointment is a shrewd one by May. His popularity in the country at large, apparently helped by getting stuck on a zip line and having numerous affairs, made him an obvious threat to David Cameron’s premiership. His decision to defect to the Leave campaign was widely credited with bringing it success. He canned his leadership campaign after Michael Gove launched his own bid, but the question of whether his chutzpah would beat May’s experience and gravity is still unknown.

In giving BoJo the Foreign Office, then, May hands him the photo opportunities he craves. Meanwhile, the man with real power in international affairs will be David Davis, who as Brexit minister has the far more daunting task of renegotiating Britain’s trade deals.