US politics from outside the beltway

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US Press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. Good Enough (Slate)

Romney wins solidly in New Hampshire. Will the victory finally persuade conservatives to support him? John Dickerson investigates.

2. Give Guantánamo Back to Cuba (New York Times)

Few gestures would improve American-Cuban relations as much as handing over the coveted piece of land that houses the Guantánamo Bay detention camp, Jonathan M. Hansen argues.

3. 'Acceptable' is pronounced 'winner' (Boston Globe) ($)

For anyone gauging the GOP presidential contest, this week's most significant poll results weren't the ones tabulated in N.H. They were the ones released by Gallup yesterday, Jeff Jacoby writes.

4. Was $73B of Afghan aid wasted? (Politico)

James Peterson writes that the money isn't going where we think it is and that's a lot of wasted treasure.

5. The U.S. needs to intensify sanctions on Iran (Washington Post)

Now is no time to relax sanctions, according to this editorial board.

6. How to predict a president (Los Angeles Times)

Forget Iowa and New Hampshire, or 7-Eleven coffee cup polls, or astrologers. People vote their pocketbooks, this editorial argues.

7. Though world stood still, things moving forward in Haiti (Chicago Tribune)

U. of C. professor of medicine helping launch residency program in Haiti, marking 2nd anniversary of quake, writes Dawn Turner Trice.

8. Republican candidates try to assert their blue-collar instincts (Washington Post)

According to Harold Meyerson, Republicans rediscover the working-class.

9. Paving paradise: The way to a better world? (Oregonian)

Paving roads in rural areas has enormous human benefits and not just by putting millions of people to work worldwide, Charles Kenny writes.

10. WWBDD? What will Bill Daley do? Readers offer their ideas. (Chicago Tribune)

President Barack Obama, a stranger to these lands of late, returns to Chicago on Wednesday to pick up oodles of ridiculous political cash from rich people in private so he can demonize other rich people in public and play the reformer, writes John Kass.