US Press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. Bain of His Existence (Slate)

GOP rivals level new and surprisingly devastating attacks on Romney's business record. John Dickerson discusses.

2. Guantánamo -- 10 years and counting (Miami Herald)

This editorial warns that Congress is moving backward in upholding civil liberties.

3. Will Independents Vote GOP In 2012? (Wall Street Journal) ($)

Survey data show it would be a mistake to assume that dissatisfaction with President Obama will translate into votes for GOP nominee. David Brady and Douglas Rivers investigate.

4. The power of super PACs (Washington Post)

This editorial looks at the power of super PACs and the dangerous fiction behind them.

5. Protecting Marine Protected Areas (Los Angeles Times)

This editorial writes that the state doesn't have nearly enough enforcement staff to ensure compliance, so various environmental groups are gearing up to watch over their local waters.

6. Where Are the Liberals? (New York Times)

All circumstances point to a golden age for liberalism. But the left is maxed out, David Brooks argues.

7. Ron Paul's social problem (San Francisco Chronicle)

This editorial argues that Ron Paul's opposition to the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, as well as his criticism of Washington's war on drugs, has made him appealing to some voters who would otherwise never vote Republican.

8. The FCC, the Supreme Court and policing indecency (Los Angeles Times)

Punishing a broadcaster for inadvertent remarks over which it has no control makes no sense, this editorial states.

9. Please Hold the Cheese (New York Times)

The Republicans' double-debate weekend offered a vivid illustration of why Americans are so cynical about politicians, Frank Bruni writes.

10. Government employees' free speech on trial (Washington Times)

Mark Mix writes how the Supreme Court challenge strikes at the root of Big Labor's political clout.

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Nineties boyband 5ive pull out of pro-Brexit concert, after learning it was “political”

“As a band, Five have no political allegiances.”

I woke up today with this feeling that better things are coming my way. One of those better things was Leave.EU’s BPop Live, the bizarre pro-Brexit concert at the NEC arena in Birmingham. With a line-up including Nineties stars 5ive, Alesha Dixon and East 17, as well as speeches from Nigel Farage, Dr Liam Fox and Kate Hoey, it was sure to be deliciously awkward fun.

But those halcyon days were over as soon as they began. Reports are now circling that the two original members of 5ive who had signed up to the gig, Ritchie Neville and Scott Robinson, have cancelled their appearance after realising that this was, in fact, a political concert.

A spokesperson told the Mirror:

When Rich and Scott agreed to play the event they understood that it was a pop concert funded by one of the Brexit organisations and not a political rally.

Ah, one of those non-political Brexit-funded concerts, then.

As it has come to light that this is more a political rally with entertainment included they have both decided to cancel their involvement. They would like to make it clear that as a band Five have no political allegiances or opinions for either side.

5ive have no political allegiance. They are lone wolves, making their way in this world with nothing but a thirst for vigilante justice. 5ive are the resident president, the 5th element. They know no allegiances. (Also, it’s 5ive with a 5, I will have it no other way.)

Their allegiance is first and foremost to their fans.

Ok, I’m tearing up now. I pledge allegiance to the band

A divide between two members of the Nineties’ best-loved boybands is terrifying to imagine. They must have felt like they should have been screaming, trying to get through to their friends. Sometimes, it feels that life has no meaning, but, if I know 5ive, things will be alright in the end. For who else can truly get on up, when they’re down?

Anna Leszkiewicz is a pop culture writer at the New Statesman.