US Press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. Taxes at the top (New York Times)

The tax policy question of why the rich bear a light tax burden comes up with Mitt Romney's "Dance of the Seven Veils" around his own taxes, says Paul Krugman.

2. Happy trails, Rick Perry (Los Angeles Times)

The departure from the GOP race of "the divisive, inarticulate Texas governor" is good news to everybody except late-night comedians, argues this editorial.

3. Get politics out of infrastructure (Politico)

Though maybe good for electroral politics, shunning foreign investment is not going to boost the economy, according to Christopher Lee and Sean Medcalf.

4. The Americans no one wants to talk about (Washington Post)

Political debates seldom touch on the most pressing issues of hardship, writes Michael Gerson.

5. What Ron Paul wants (Wall Street Jorunal) ($)

Even though he knows he can't win, the republican candidate wants to make clear his views on national security and presidential power, according to Kimberley A. Strassel.

6. Buying democracy (Denver Post)

Spending on political advertising is an assault on democracy, writes Ken Gordon.

7. Where are the republican populists? (Washington Post)

The economically conservative and corporate wing of the Republican party always seem to win, according to E.J. Dionne.

8. The things soldiers do (Chicago Tribune)

What seems acceptable in war is deplorable outside of it, writes Leonard Pitts.

9. What to do about Iran (Boston Globe) ($)

The US should have strategic patience instead of rushing to war, argues Nicholas Burns.

10. State of the Union: A civil action (Politico)

Congress should appear as one body, not two sides, according to Jon Cowan and Jim Kessler.

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Nineties boyband 5ive pull out of pro-Brexit concert, after learning it was “political”

“As a band, Five have no political allegiances.”

I woke up today with this feeling that better things are coming my way. One of those better things was Leave.EU’s BPop Live, the bizarre pro-Brexit concert at the NEC arena in Birmingham. With a line-up including Nineties stars 5ive, Alesha Dixon and East 17, as well as speeches from Nigel Farage, Dr Liam Fox and Kate Hoey, it was sure to be deliciously awkward fun.

But those halcyon days were over as soon as they began. Reports are now circling that the two original members of 5ive who had signed up to the gig, Ritchie Neville and Scott Robinson, have cancelled their appearance after realising that this was, in fact, a political concert.

A spokesperson told the Mirror:

When Rich and Scott agreed to play the event they understood that it was a pop concert funded by one of the Brexit organisations and not a political rally.

Ah, one of those non-political Brexit-funded concerts, then.

As it has come to light that this is more a political rally with entertainment included they have both decided to cancel their involvement. They would like to make it clear that as a band Five have no political allegiances or opinions for either side.

5ive have no political allegiance. They are lone wolves, making their way in this world with nothing but a thirst for vigilante justice. 5ive are the resident president, the 5th element. They know no allegiances. (Also, it’s 5ive with a 5, I will have it no other way.)

Their allegiance is first and foremost to their fans.

Ok, I’m tearing up now. I pledge allegiance to the band

A divide between two members of the Nineties’ best-loved boybands is terrifying to imagine. They must have felt like they should have been screaming, trying to get through to their friends. Sometimes, it feels that life has no meaning, but, if I know 5ive, things will be alright in the end. For who else can truly get on up, when they’re down?

Anna Leszkiewicz is a pop culture writer at the New Statesman.