US Press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. Taxes at the top (New York Times)

The tax policy question of why the rich bear a light tax burden comes up with Mitt Romney's "Dance of the Seven Veils" around his own taxes, says Paul Krugman.

2. Happy trails, Rick Perry (Los Angeles Times)

The departure from the GOP race of "the divisive, inarticulate Texas governor" is good news to everybody except late-night comedians, argues this editorial.

3. Get politics out of infrastructure (Politico)

Though maybe good for electroral politics, shunning foreign investment is not going to boost the economy, according to Christopher Lee and Sean Medcalf.

4. The Americans no one wants to talk about (Washington Post)

Political debates seldom touch on the most pressing issues of hardship, writes Michael Gerson.

5. What Ron Paul wants (Wall Street Jorunal) ($)

Even though he knows he can't win, the republican candidate wants to make clear his views on national security and presidential power, according to Kimberley A. Strassel.

6. Buying democracy (Denver Post)

Spending on political advertising is an assault on democracy, writes Ken Gordon.

7. Where are the republican populists? (Washington Post)

The economically conservative and corporate wing of the Republican party always seem to win, according to E.J. Dionne.

8. The things soldiers do (Chicago Tribune)

What seems acceptable in war is deplorable outside of it, writes Leonard Pitts.

9. What to do about Iran (Boston Globe) ($)

The US should have strategic patience instead of rushing to war, argues Nicholas Burns.

10. State of the Union: A civil action (Politico)

Congress should appear as one body, not two sides, according to Jon Cowan and Jim Kessler.

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Britain is running out of allies as it squares up to Russia

For whatever reason, Donald Trump is going to be no friend of an anti-Russia foreign policy.

The row over Donald Trump and that dossier rumbles on.

Nothing puts legs on a story like a domestic angle, and that the retired spy who compiled the file is a one of our own has excited Britain’s headline writers. The man in question, Christopher Steele, has gone to ground having told his neighbour to look after his cats before vanishing.

Although the dossier contains known errors, Steele is regarded in the intelligence community as a serious operator not known for passing on unsubstantiated rumours, which is one reason why American intelligence is investigating the claims.

“Britain's role in Trump dossier” is the Telegraph’s splash, “The ‘credible’ ex-MI6 man behind Trump Russia report” is the Guardian’s angle, “British spy in hiding” is the i’s splash.

But it’s not only British headline writers who are exercised by Mr Steele; the Russian government is too. “MI6 officers are never ex,” the Russian Embassy tweeted, accusing the UK of “briefing both ways - against Russia and US President”. “Kremlin blames Britain for Trump sex storm” is the Mail’s splash.

Elsewhere, Crispin Blunt, the chair of the Foreign Affairs Select Committee, warns that relations between the United Kingdom and Russia are as “bad as they can get” in peacetime.

Though much of the coverage of the Trump dossier has focused on the eyecatching claims about whether or not the President-Elect was caught in a Russian honeytrap, the important thing, as I said yesterday, is that the man who is seven days from becoming President of the United States, whether through inclination or intimidation, is not going to be a reliable friend of the United Kingdom against Russia.

Though Emanuel Macron might just sneak into the second round of the French presidency, it still looks likely that the final choice for French voters will be an all-Russia affair, between Francois Fillon and Marine Le Pen.

For one reason or another, Britain’s stand against Russia looks likely to be very lonely indeed.

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.