US Press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. Taxes at the top (New York Times)

The tax policy question of why the rich bear a light tax burden comes up with Mitt Romney's "Dance of the Seven Veils" around his own taxes, says Paul Krugman.

2. Happy trails, Rick Perry (Los Angeles Times)

The departure from the GOP race of "the divisive, inarticulate Texas governor" is good news to everybody except late-night comedians, argues this editorial.

3. Get politics out of infrastructure (Politico)

Though maybe good for electroral politics, shunning foreign investment is not going to boost the economy, according to Christopher Lee and Sean Medcalf.

4. The Americans no one wants to talk about (Washington Post)

Political debates seldom touch on the most pressing issues of hardship, writes Michael Gerson.

5. What Ron Paul wants (Wall Street Jorunal) ($)

Even though he knows he can't win, the republican candidate wants to make clear his views on national security and presidential power, according to Kimberley A. Strassel.

6. Buying democracy (Denver Post)

Spending on political advertising is an assault on democracy, writes Ken Gordon.

7. Where are the republican populists? (Washington Post)

The economically conservative and corporate wing of the Republican party always seem to win, according to E.J. Dionne.

8. The things soldiers do (Chicago Tribune)

What seems acceptable in war is deplorable outside of it, writes Leonard Pitts.

9. What to do about Iran (Boston Globe) ($)

The US should have strategic patience instead of rushing to war, argues Nicholas Burns.

10. State of the Union: A civil action (Politico)

Congress should appear as one body, not two sides, according to Jon Cowan and Jim Kessler.

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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Boris Johnson as Foreign Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs.

The world shared a stunned silence when news broke that Boris Johnson would be the new Foreign Secretary. Johnson, who once referred to black people as “piccaninnies” and more recently accused the half-Kenyan President of the United States of only commenting on the EU referendum because of bitterness about colonialism, will now be Britain’s representative on the world stage.

His colourful career immediately came back to haunt him when US journalists accused him of “outright lies” and reminded him of the time he likened Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton to a “sadistic nurse”. Johnson’s previous appearances on the international stage include a speech in Beijing where he maintained that ping pong was actually the Victorian game of “whiff whaff”.

But Johnson has always been more than a blond buffoon, and this appointment is a shrewd one by May. His popularity in the country at large, apparently helped by getting stuck on a zip line and having numerous affairs, made him an obvious threat to David Cameron’s premiership. His decision to defect to the Leave campaign was widely credited with bringing it success. He canned his leadership campaign after Michael Gove launched his own bid, but the question of whether his chutzpah would beat May’s experience and gravity is still unknown.

In giving BoJo the Foreign Office, then, May hands him the photo opportunities he craves. Meanwhile, the man with real power in international affairs will be David Davis, who as Brexit minister has the far more daunting task of renegotiating Britain’s trade deals.