US Press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1.SOPA protest: The Net strikes back (Politico)

Internet companies ratcheted up their fight against anti-piracy bills in Congress on Wednesday, says Tony Romm

2.Would today's GOP elect Reagan? (Chicago Tribune)

Even Ronald Reagan would have a hard time getting nominated in today's GOP race, claims Clarence Page

3.What Mitt Romney's father could teach him about economic fairness (Washington Post)

George Romney exemplified a lost species of American business leaders, says Matt Miller

4.Burning America's future (Los Angeles Times)

An energy policy outlined by the head of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce in which we use all of the nation's coal, gas and oil is beyond dumb, writes Bill McKibben

5.Plastic Man's perils (Chicago Tribune)

Mitt Romney lunges rightward. Is he moving in the wrong direction? asks Paul Begala

6. For God So Loved the 1 Percent (New York Times)

In recent weeks Mitt Romney has become the poster child for unchecked capitalism, a role he seems to embrace with relish, says Kevin M Kruse

7.Newtering Obama's re-election strategy (Washington Times)

Failure of Gingrich's anti-capitalism attacks doesn't bode well for the president, writes Dr. Milton R. Wolf

8.Mitt Romney's tax return problem (Politico)

For Mitt Romney, the choice is stark. He can stop equivocating and cough up the tax returns that his rival Republicans and reporters are clamoring for, claims Reid J. Epstein

9.Iran sanctions won't work (Washington Times)

Effectiveness of economic restrictions always erodes over time, says Ivan Eland

10.Offering a path to legalization for illegal immigrants could mean a local tax windfall (Houston Chronicle)

A report by the Greater Houston Partnership estimated that legalizing Houston-area undocumented workers would generate about $1.4 billion annually in tax revenue, argues this editorial

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Theresa May condemns Big Ben’s silence – but stays silent on Donald Trump’s Nazi defence

Priorities.

You know what it’s like when you get back from your summer holiday. You have the inbox from hell, your laundry schedule is a nightmare, you’ve put on a few pounds, and you receive the harrowing news that a loud bell will chime slightly less often.

Well, Theresa May is currently experiencing this bummer of a homecoming. Imagine it: Philip’s taking out the bins, she’s putting the third load on (carefully separating shirt dresses from leathers), she switches on Radio 4 and is suddenly struck by the cruel realisation that Big Ben’s bongs will fall silent for a few years.

It takes a while for the full extent of the atrocity to sink in. A big old clock will have to be fixed. For a bit. Its bell will not chime. But sometimes it will.

God, is there no end to this pain.

“It can’t be right,” she thinks.

Meanwhile, the President of the United States Donald Trump is busy excusing a literal Nazi rally which is so violent someone was killed. Instead of condemning the fascists, Trump insisted there was violence on both sides – causing resignations and disgust in his own administration and outrage across the world.

At first, May’s spokesperson commented that “what the President says is a matter for him” and condemned the far right, and then the PM continued in the same vein – denouncing the fascists but not directing any criticism at the President himself:

“I see no equivalence between those who profound fascists views and those who oppose them.

“I think it is important for all those in positions of responsibility to condemn far-right views wherever we hear them.”

Unlike May, other politicians here – including senior Tories – immediately explicitly criticised Trump. The Scottish Tory leader Ruth Davidson said Trump had “turned his face to the world to defend Nazis, fascists and racists. For shame”, while justice minister Sam Gyimah said the President has lost “moral authority”.

So our Right Honourable leader, the head of Her Majesty’s Government, the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, made another statement:

“Of course we want to ensure people’s safety at work but it can’t be right for Big Ben to be silent for four years.

“And I hope that the speaker, as the chairman of the House of Commons commission, will look into this urgently so that we can ensure that we can continue to hear Big Ben through those four years.”

Nailed it. The years ahead hang in the balance, and it was her duty to speak up.

I'm a mole, innit.