Castro: US president should be a robot

Ninety per cent of voters would back the robot, says former Cuban leader.

In his weekly "Reflections of Fidel" column, former Cuban leader Fidel Castro said a robot would be the best candidate for the upcoming US election.

In the column, titled "The best president for the United States", Castro writes:

Is it not obvious that worst of all is the absence in the White House of a robot capable of governing the United States and preventing a war to end the life of our species?

He also criticised Obama, describing him as "a good orator, for who in his desperate attempt for reelection, the dreams of [Martin] Luther King are further away in light years than the closest habitable planet [to earth]."

"Even worse," he continued, "are any of the presidential Republican candidates , or a leader of the Tea Party, [who] carries more nuclear weapons on his back than ideas of peace in his head."

Castro concluded by saying he is "sure that 90 per cent of registered Americans, especially hispanics, blacks, and the now impoverished middle class, would vote for the robot".

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When Donald Trump talks, remember that Donald Trump almost always lies

Anyone getting excited about a trade deal between the United States and the United Kingdom should pay more attention to what Trump does, not what he says. 

Celebrations all round at the Times, which has bagged the first British newspaper interview with President-Elect Donald Trump.

Here are the headlines: he’s said that the EU has become a “vehicle for Germany”, that Nato is “obsolete” as it hasn’t focused on the big issue of the time (tackling Islamic terrorism), and that he expects that other countries will join the United Kingdom in leaving the European Union.

But what will trigger celebrations outside of the News Building is that Trump has this to say about a US-UK trade deal: his administration will ““work very hard to get it done quickly and done properly”. Time for champagne at Downing Street?

When reading or listening to an interview with Donald Trump, don’t forget that this is the man who has lied about, among other things, who really paid for gifts to charity on Celebrity Apprentice, being named Michigan’s Man of the Year in 2011, and making Mexico pay for a border wall between it and the United States. So take everything he promises with an ocean’s worth of salt, and instead look at what he does.   

Remember that in the same interview, the President-Elect threatened to hit BMW with sanctions over its decision to put a factory in Mexico, not the United States. More importantly, look at the people he is appointing to fill key trade posts: they are not free traders or anything like it. Anyone waiting for a Trump-backed trade deal that is “good for the UK” will wait a long time.

And as chess champion turned Putin-critic-in-chief Garry Kasparov notes on Twitter, it’s worth noting that Trump’s remarks on foreign affairs are near-identical to Putin’s. The idea that Nato’s traditional purpose is obsolete and that the focus should be on Islamic terrorism, meanwhile, will come as a shock to the Baltic states, and indeed, to the 650 British soldiers who have been sent to Estonia and Poland as part of a Nato deployment to deter Russian aggression against those countries.

All in all, I wouldn’t start declaring the new President is good news for the UK just yet.

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.