US Press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. Newt Gingrich and the revenge of the base (Washington Post)

E.J. Dionne Jr. on the fear and loathing of GOP establishmentarians toward Newt Gingrich.

2. Capitalism and the right to rise (Wall Street Journal)

In freedom lies the risk of failure. But in statism lies the certainty of stagnation, writes Jeb Bush.

3. Why mandated health insurance is unfair (Wall Street Journal)

John C. Goodman questions whether a mandate is a good idea.

4. Recession reveals cruelty and failure of 'welfare reform' (St. Louis Today)

The creeping pace of recovery from the recession of 2007-2009 continues to keep unemployment persistently high and inflict significant pain on people and families throughout the country, this Editorial argues.

5. Holding the line against mercury (Detroit Free Press)

So far, the Obama administration has held fast to its plan to enforce mercury limits on coal-burning power plants. That's a good - and long overdue - step, according to editorial staff at Detroit Free Press.

6.Government and bond markets: Huge debts make a mockery of Keynes' remedies (Oregonian)

Robert J. Samuelson on the eclipse of Keynesian economics.

7. A clear winner (Chicago Tribune)

The GOP debates have been a boon, this Editorial argues.

8. Saving face (Slate)

Evgeny Morozov examines how Google, Facebook, and other tech companies hide behind "opt-in" policies.

9. Can you text 'draconian' while driving? (Washington Post)

Safety officials could lobby for what works, but they went for what satisfies, writes Dana Milbank.

10. A deliberative convention (Weekly Standard)

Once every three-quarters of a century or so, the delegates to an American political convention deliberate, and produce an impressive outcome. William Kristol thinks it could happen again in 2012.

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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Boris Johnson as Foreign Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs.

The world shared a stunned silence when news broke that Boris Johnson would be the new Foreign Secretary. Johnson, who once referred to black people as “piccaninnies” and more recently accused the half-Kenyan President of the United States of only commenting on the EU referendum because of bitterness about colonialism, will now be Britain’s representative on the world stage.

His colourful career immediately came back to haunt him when US journalists accused him of “outright lies” and reminded him of the time he likened Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton to a “sadistic nurse”. Johnson’s previous appearances on the international stage include a speech in Beijing where he maintained that ping pong was actually the Victorian game of “whiff whaff”.

But Johnson has always been more than a blond buffoon, and this appointment is a shrewd one by May. His popularity in the country at large, apparently helped by getting stuck on a zip line and having numerous affairs, made him an obvious threat to David Cameron’s premiership. His decision to defect to the Leave campaign was widely credited with bringing it success. He canned his leadership campaign after Michael Gove launched his own bid, but the question of whether his chutzpah would beat May’s experience and gravity is still unknown.

In giving BoJo the Foreign Office, then, May hands him the photo opportunities he craves. Meanwhile, the man with real power in international affairs will be David Davis, who as Brexit minister has the far more daunting task of renegotiating Britain’s trade deals.