US Press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. Which candidate should answer that 3am phone call? (Washington Post)

During the 2008 campaign, Hillary Clinton famously asked whether Obama was ready for the 3am phone call about a foreign crisis. Kim's death reminds us that it's always 3am somewhere in the world, writes Eugene Robinson.

2. Obama's foreign-policy strategy must confront new dangers (Omaha World Herald)

David Ignatius on what's next for Obama.

3. What a couple of grandpas learned at Occupy Detroit (Detroit Free Press)

Robert Deneweth and Ronald Aronson went to Grand Circus Park last month before Occupy Detroit moved out of its encampment; they reflect on what they discovered.

4. Blaming the Jews - Again (The Weekly Standard)

Elliott Abrams on Thomas Friedman, Joe Klein and anti-Semitism.

5. GOP candidates: Bashing judges, threatening democracy (Los Angeles Times)

Americans should flatly reject rhetoric by Republican presidential candidates and remember that an independent judiciary enforcing the Constitution is crucial to our democracy, according to Erwin Chemerinsky.

6. Higher education should not lose in budget game again (St. Louis Today)

Despite lofty rhetoric from governors and lawmakers about how education is vital to economic development, Missouri remains near the bottom, as this Editorial shows.

7. Instead of just taxing the rich, put cap on income inequality (New York Times)

As 1-per centers themselves, Ian Ayres and Aaron S. Edlin call on Congress, for the sake of democracy, to end the continued erosion of economic equality in our nation.

8. Protecting liberty means knowing your Bill of Rights (Washington Examiner)

Janine Turner on the the 220th anniversary of the ratification of the Bill of Rights.

9. Barack Obama at a crossroads (again) (Politico)

Stand up to House Republicans - or cave under pressure rather than risk an unwanted outcome? Carrue Budoff Brown and Glenn Thrush examine the crossroads Obama finds himself at.

10. US mail is slow and getting slower (The Plain Dealer)

It's time to end the post office's monopoly on letter delivery, writes James Bovard.

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Nineties boyband 5ive pull out of pro-Brexit concert, after learning it was “political”

“As a band, Five have no political allegiances.”

I woke up today with this feeling that better things are coming my way. One of those better things was Leave.EU’s BPop Live, the bizarre pro-Brexit concert at the NEC arena in Birmingham. With a line-up including Nineties stars 5ive, Alesha Dixon and East 17, as well as speeches from Nigel Farage, Dr Liam Fox and Kate Hoey, it was sure to be deliciously awkward fun.

But those halcyon days were over as soon as they began. Reports are now circling that the two original members of 5ive who had signed up to the gig, Ritchie Neville and Scott Robinson, have cancelled their appearance after realising that this was, in fact, a political concert.

A spokesperson told the Mirror:

When Rich and Scott agreed to play the event they understood that it was a pop concert funded by one of the Brexit organisations and not a political rally.

Ah, one of those non-political Brexit-funded concerts, then.

As it has come to light that this is more a political rally with entertainment included they have both decided to cancel their involvement. They would like to make it clear that as a band Five have no political allegiances or opinions for either side.

5ive have no political allegiance. They are lone wolves, making their way in this world with nothing but a thirst for vigilante justice. 5ive are the resident president, the 5th element. They know no allegiances. (Also, it’s 5ive with a 5, I will have it no other way.)

Their allegiance is first and foremost to their fans.

Ok, I’m tearing up now. I pledge allegiance to the band

A divide between two members of the Nineties’ best-loved boybands is terrifying to imagine. They must have felt like they should have been screaming, trying to get through to their friends. Sometimes, it feels that life has no meaning, but, if I know 5ive, things will be alright in the end. For who else can truly get on up, when they’re down?

Anna Leszkiewicz is a pop culture writer at the New Statesman.