Video of police pepper-spraying protesters causes outrage

Two campus police officers suspended over use of the chemical on peaceful protesters at University o

 

This video, showing police calmly pepper-spraying a row of peaceful protesters at close-range, has caused outrage. The incident took place on Friday at the University of California, Davis, where students were protesting in solidarity with the Occupy movement. The video was subsequently uploaded to YouTube and has prompted outrage across the US.

The university's faculty association, which represents academic staff, has called on the chancellor, Linda Katehi, to resign:

This week, we have seen excessive force used against non-violent protesters. Student, faculty and staff protesters have been pepper-sprayed directly in the eyes and mouth, beaten and shoved by batons, dragged by the arms while handcuffed, and submitted to other forms of excessive force.

She refused to resign, saying that she had not violated the rules of the institution. She said:

The use of pepper spray as shown on the video is chilling to us all and raises many questions about how best to handle situations like this.

The Occupy Wall Street protest began two months ago in New York and other protest have sprung up across the US and the world. Images of police action against protesters have galvanised support in the last few weeks, with skirmishes in Oakland last month leaving an Iraq war veteran seriously injured.

Samira Shackle is a freelance journalist, who tweets @samirashackle. She was formerly a staff writer for the New Statesman.

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Lord Sainsbury pulls funding from Progress and other political causes

The longstanding Labour donor will no longer fund party political causes. 

Centrist Labour MPs face a funding gap for their ideas after the longstanding Labour donor Lord Sainsbury announced he will stop financing party political causes.

Sainsbury, who served as a New Labour minister and also donated to the Liberal Democrats, is instead concentrating on charitable causes. 

Lord Sainsbury funded the centrist organisation Progress, dubbed the “original Blairite pressure group”, which was founded in mid Nineties and provided the intellectual underpinnings of New Labour.

The former supermarket boss is understood to still fund Policy Network, an international thinktank headed by New Labour veteran Peter Mandelson.

He has also funded the Remain campaign group Britain Stronger in Europe. The latter reinvented itself as Open Britain after the Leave vote, and has campaigned for a softer Brexit. Its supporters include former Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg and Labour's Chuka Umunna, and it now relies on grassroots funding.

Sainsbury said he wished to “hand the baton on to a new generation of donors” who supported progressive politics. 

Progress director Richard Angell said: “Progress is extremely grateful to Lord Sainsbury for the funding he has provided for over two decades. We always knew it would not last forever.”

The organisation has raised a third of its funding target from other donors, but is now appealing for financial support from Labour supporters. Its aims include “stopping a hard-left take over” of the Labour party and “renewing the ideas of the centre-left”. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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