US Press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. Assassination backlash (LA Times)

Andrew Cockburn questions the effectiveness of taxpayer-funded assassinations.

2. Occupying vs. Tea Partying (Wall Street Journal)

Matte Kibbe writes that progressives' burning desire to create a tea party of the left may be clouding their judgment.

3. Thank the Palestinians (New York Post)

This editorial posits that the Palestinian's bid for statehood has done the US taxpayer a considerable favor.

4. Let the women speak (Chicago Tribune)

Herman Cain isn't the only one feeling the heat over those 12-year-old allegations of sexual harassment, writes this editorial. The National Restaurant Association is on the griddle, too.

5. Why not let the Greeks drown in their drachmas? (Washington Examiner)

If the Greeks decide to be stubborn, let them drown in their own drachmas, and let the European banks that unwisely lent to them -- as Socrates would have put it -- swallow their owls; so says this editorial.

6. Manufacture or perish (Washington Post)

Harold Meyerson wonders if cultivating America's inventive geniusis is the way to can restore economic leadership.

7. Global trade: It's time to stop complaining and learn to compete (The Oregonian)

Where foreign trade is concerned, the United States acts like the gambler who talks big but bets small, writes Jack Roberts.

8. Dutch Bike Liberals (Slate)

The 99 percent takes over Brooklyn, writes Katie Roiphe.

9. Power of partnership (Politico)

Sen. Ron Wyden and Sen. Olympia Snowe argue that bipartisan tax reform is possible.

10. Would Cain Be Leading the Race if He Were White? (Roll Call)

Rallying behind a conservative African-American candidate for the Republican nomination is appealing to many conservatives, if only to prove to they aren't the racists they are often portrayed to be, writes Stuart Rothenberg.

BBC
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“Why are you here?”: Juncker and MEPs mock Nigel Farage at the European Parliament

Returning to the scene of the crime.

In today's European Parliament session, Jean-Claude Juncker, president of the European Commission, tried his best to keep things cordial during a debate on Brexit. He asked MEPs to "respect British democracy and the way it voiced its view".

Unfortunately, Nigel Farage, UKIP leader and MEP, felt it necessary to voice his view a little more by applauding - the last straw even for Juncker, who turned and spat: "That's the last time you are applauding here." 

MEPs laughed and clapped, and he continued: "I am surprised you are here. You are fighting for the exit. The British people voted in f avour of the exit. Why are you here?"  

Watch the exchange here:

Farage responded with an impromptu speech, in which he pointed out that MEPs laughed when he first planned to campaign for Britain to leave the EU: "Well, you're not laughing now". Hee said the EU was in "denial" and that its project had "failed".

MPs booed again.

He continued:

"Because what the little people did, what the ordinary people did – what the people who’d been oppressed over the last few years who’d seen their living standards go down did – was they rejected the multinationals, they rejected the merchant banks, they rejected big politics and they said actually, we want our country back, we want our fishing waters back, we want our borders back. 

"We want to be an independent, self-governing, normal nation. That is what we have done and that is what must happen. In doing so we now offer a beacon of hope to democrats across the rest of the European continent. I’ll make one prediction this morning: the United Kingdom will not be the last member state to leave the European Union."

The Independent has a full transcript of the speech.

Now, it sounds like Farage had something prepared – so it's no wonder he turned up in Brussels for this important task today, while Brexiteers in Britain frantically try to put together a plan for leaving the EU.

But your mole has to wonder if perhaps, in the face of a falling British pound and a party whose major source of income is MEP salaries and expenses, Farage is less willing to give up his cushy European job than he might like us to think. 

I'm a mole, innit.