US Press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. Doctrine of Silence (New York Times)

On U.S. strategic policy, Obama has gone covert -- and made the right call. So why is Roger Cohen uneasy?

2. Moderates of both parties should unite (Chicago Tribune)

The deficit that should most worry us is a deficit of reasonableness, writes E. J. Dionne.

3. What Happened on the Border? (New York Times)

A transparent investigation of the NATO strikes with Pakistan's participation is essential, urges this editorial.

4. Wrong and righteous (Washington Post)

Obama has no room to complain about ad distortions, argues Michael Gerson.

5. Occupy L.A.: The eviction that wasn't (Los Angeles Times)

Carla Hall asks: did the LAPD's peaceful nonconfrontation bring the Occupy L.A. demonstration closer to a conclusion, or did it simply give the protesters more leverage?

6. With AIDS at 30, is daylight at the end of the tunnel? (Detroit Free Press)

This Thursday's commemoration of World AIDS Day marks a potential turning point in the fight against a global epidemic that has yet to be arrested, suggests this editorial.

7. Obama Abandons the Working Class (Wall Street Journal)

William McGurn believes there's an opening for Romney, if he's smart enough.

8. The (plastic) eyes have it (Boston Globe) ($)

The Muppet Movie' isn't a reboot for modern sensibilities, says Joanna Weiss, but instead is an effort to recapture something lost, and a nostalgia trip for Generation Xers.

9. School lunch guidelines lose to cooks in Congress (USA Today)

According to this editorial, politicians stood up for pizza and fries, and their friends in the frozen food industry, instead of kids.

10. Why can't Newt win? Because he's Newt (Denver Post)

"Gingrich has made a career of being a lying, adultering, money-chasing historian/non-lobbyist who wants to be president," writes Mike Littwin.

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“Trembling, shaking / Oh, my heart is aching”: the EU out campaign song will give you chills

But not in a good way.

You know the story. Some old guys with vague dreams of empire want Britain to leave the European Union. They’ve been kicking up such a big fuss over the past few years that the government is letting the public decide.

And what is it that sways a largely politically indifferent electorate? Strikes hope in their hearts for a mildly less bureaucratic yet dangerously human rights-free future? An anthem, of course!

Originally by Carly You’re so Vain Simon, this is the song the Leave.EU campaign (Nigel Farage’s chosen group) has chosen. It is performed by the singer Antonia Suñer, for whom freedom from the technofederalists couldn’t come any suñer.

Here are the lyrics, of which your mole has done a close reading. But essentially it’s just nature imagery with fascist undertones and some heartburn.

"Let the river run

"Let all the dreamers

"Wake the nation.

"Come, the new Jerusalem."

Don’t use a river metaphor in anything political, unless you actively want to evoke Enoch Powell. Also, Jerusalem? That’s a bit... strong, isn’t it? Heavy connotations of being a little bit too Englandy.

"Silver cities rise,

"The morning lights,

"The streets that meet them,

"And sirens call them on

"With a song."

Sirens and streets. Doesn’t sound like a wholly un-authoritarian view of the UK’s EU-free future to me.

"It’s asking for the taking,

"Trembling, shaking,

"Oh, my heart is aching."

A reference to the elderly nature of many of the UK’s eurosceptics, perhaps?

"We’re coming to the edge,

"Running on the water,

"Coming through the fog,

"Your sons and daughters."

I feel like this is something to do with the hosepipe ban.

"We the great and small,

"Stand on a star,

"And blaze a trail of desire,

"Through the dark’ning dawn."

Everyone will have to speak this kind of English in the new Jerusalem, m'lady, oft with shorten’d words which will leave you feeling cringéd.

"It’s asking for the taking.

"Come run with me now,

"The sky is the colour of blue,

"You’ve never even seen,

"In the eyes of your lover."

I think this means: no one has ever loved anyone with the same colour eyes as the EU flag.

I'm a mole, innit.