US Press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. We Are the 99.9% (New York Times)

The 99 per cent slogan is great, writes Paul Krugman, but it actually aims too low. A big chunk of the top 1 per cent's gains have gone to an even smaller group, the top 0.1 per cent.

2. Bye Bye Biden? (Wall Street Journal)

Peter Du Point thinks Obama may be eyeing Mrs. Clinton for the 2012 ticket.

3. The GOP contemplates a marriage (Washington Post)

Michael Gerson reports on the GOP's latest choice: Steady Romney or risky Gingrich?

4. Stuffing ourselves on Black Friday (Los Angeles Times)

On the biggest shopping day of the year, Annie Leonard and Rick Ridgeway suggest you think for a moment about the demands our consumption makes on the planet's resources and ask: Does our family need more stuff?

5. Hard drives, hard questions (Boston Globe) ($)

This editorial argues Republican primary voters deserve more give and take from candidate Mitt Romney, who criticizes the Obama administration for a lack of transparency.

6. Congress, don't fail us now (Denver Post)

Not acting on payroll tax cuts, unemployment benefits and Medicare would result in disaster, says this editorial.

7. Prison dysfunction (Chicago Tribune)

Jonah Goldberg describes "why we love all those criminals"

8. History too kind to Puritans' brutal intolerance (Detroit Free Press)

Eric Sharp syas Americans should give a thought to the enduring myth that Thanksgiving perpetuates.

9. Why the 'supercommittee' failed (USA Today)

One reason is political polarization, says this editorial. Another is that party leaders delegated the job to people with less clout.

10. Why We Spend, Why They Save (New York Times)

Europeans save more than Americans do. Sheldon Garon asks: "what can we learn from them?"

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What does François Bayrou's endorsement of Emmanuel Macron mean for the French presidential race?

The support of the perennial candidate for President will boost Macron's morale but won't transform his electoral standing. 

François Bayrou, the leader of the centrist Democratic Movement and a candidate for the French presidency in 2007 and 2012, has endorsed Emmanuel Macron’s bid for the presidency.

What does it mean for the presidential race?  Under the rules of the French electoral system, if no candidate secures more than half the vote in the first round, the top two go through to a run-off.

Since 2013, Marine Le Pen has consistently led in the first round before going down to defeat in the second, regardless of the identity of her opponents, according to the polls.

However, national crises – such as terror attacks or the recent riots following the brutal arrest of a 22-year-old black man, who was sodomised with a police baton – do result in a boost for Le Pen’s standing, as does the ongoing “Penelopegate” scandal about the finances of the centre-right candidate, François Fillon.

Macron performs the most strongly of any candidate in the second round but struggles to make it into the top two in the first. Having eked out a clear lead in second place ahead of Fillon in the wake of Penelopegate, Macron’s lead has fallen back in recent polls after he said that France’s rule in Algeria was a “crime against humanity”.

Although polls show that the lion’s share of Bayrou’s supporters flow to Macron without his presence in the race, with the rest going to Fillon and Le Pen, Macron’s standing has remained unchanged regardless of whether or not Bayrou is in the race or not. So as far as the electoral battlefield is concerned, Bayrou’s decision is not a gamechanger.

But the institutional support of the Democratic Movement will add to the ability of Macron’s new party, En Marche, to get its voters to the polls on election day, though the Democratic Movement has never won a vast number of deputies or regional elections. It will further add to the good news for Macron following a successful visit to London this week, and, his supporters will hope, will transform the mood music around his campaign.

But hopes that a similar pact between Benoît Hamon, the Socialist Party candidate, and Jean-Luc Jean-Luc Mélenchon, the Left Front’s candidate, look increasingly slim, after Mélenchon said that joining up with the Socialists would be like “hanging himself to a hearse”. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.