US Press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. We Are the 99.9% (New York Times)

The 99 per cent slogan is great, writes Paul Krugman, but it actually aims too low. A big chunk of the top 1 per cent's gains have gone to an even smaller group, the top 0.1 per cent.

2. Bye Bye Biden? (Wall Street Journal)

Peter Du Point thinks Obama may be eyeing Mrs. Clinton for the 2012 ticket.

3. The GOP contemplates a marriage (Washington Post)

Michael Gerson reports on the GOP's latest choice: Steady Romney or risky Gingrich?

4. Stuffing ourselves on Black Friday (Los Angeles Times)

On the biggest shopping day of the year, Annie Leonard and Rick Ridgeway suggest you think for a moment about the demands our consumption makes on the planet's resources and ask: Does our family need more stuff?

5. Hard drives, hard questions (Boston Globe) ($)

This editorial argues Republican primary voters deserve more give and take from candidate Mitt Romney, who criticizes the Obama administration for a lack of transparency.

6. Congress, don't fail us now (Denver Post)

Not acting on payroll tax cuts, unemployment benefits and Medicare would result in disaster, says this editorial.

7. Prison dysfunction (Chicago Tribune)

Jonah Goldberg describes "why we love all those criminals"

8. History too kind to Puritans' brutal intolerance (Detroit Free Press)

Eric Sharp syas Americans should give a thought to the enduring myth that Thanksgiving perpetuates.

9. Why the 'supercommittee' failed (USA Today)

One reason is political polarization, says this editorial. Another is that party leaders delegated the job to people with less clout.

10. Why We Spend, Why They Save (New York Times)

Europeans save more than Americans do. Sheldon Garon asks: "what can we learn from them?"

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Emmanuel Macron's "moralisation of politics" comes at a heavy price for his allies

"Fake" jobs in French politics, season 3 episode 1.

Something is rotten in the state of France. No political party – at least none that existed before 2016 – seems immune to the spread of investigations into “fake” or shady parliamentary jobs. The accusations sank centre-right candidate François Fillon’s presidential campaign, and led to Marine Le Pen losing her parliamentary immunity in the European parliament (and proxy wars within her party, the National Front). Both deny the allegations. Now the investigations have made their way to the French government, led by Edouard Philippe, Emmanuel Macron’s Prime Minister.

On Wednesday morning, justice minister François Bayrou and secretary of state for European affairs Marielle de Sarnez announced their resignation from Philippe’s cabinet. They followed defence minister Sylvie Goulard’s resignation the previous day. The three politicians belonged not to Macron's party, En Marche!, but the centrist MoDem party. Bayrou, the leader, had thrown his weight behind Macron after dropping his own presidential bid in April.

The disappearance of three ministers leaves Emmanuel Macron’s cross-party government, which includes politicians from centre left and centre right parties, without a centrist helm. (Bayrou, who has run several times for the French presidency and lost, is the original “neither left nor right” politician – just with a less disruptive attitude, and a lot less luck). “I have decided not to be part of the next government,” he told the AFP.

Rumours had been spreading for weeks. Bayrou, who was last part of a French government as education minister from 1993 to 1997, had been under pressure since 9 June, when he was included in a preliminary investigation into “embezzlement”. The case revolves around whether the parliamentary assistants of MoDem's MEPs, paid for by the European Parliament, were actually working full or part-time for the party. The other two MoDem ministers who resigned, along with Bayrou, also have assistants under investigation.

Bayrou has denied the allegations. He has declared that there “never was” any case of “fake” jobs within his party and that it would be “easy to prove”. All the same, by the time he resigned, his position as justice minister has become untenable, not least because he was tasked by Macron with developing key legislation on the “moralisation of politics”, one of the new President’s campaign pledges. On 1 June, Bayrou unveiled the new law, which plans a 10-year ban from public life for any politician convicted of a crime or offence regarding honesty and transparency in their work.

Bayrou described his decision to resign as a sacrifice. “My name was never pronounced, but I was the target to hit to attack the government’s credibility,” he said, declaring he would rather “protect this law” by stepping down. The other two ministers also refuted the allegations, and gave similar reasons for resigning. 

Macron’s movement-turned-unstoppable-machine, En Marche!, remains untainted from accusations of the sort. Their 350 new MPs are younger, more diverse than is usual in France – but they are newcomers in politics. Which is exactly why Macron had sought an alliance with experienced Bayrou in the first place.

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