US Press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. We Are the 99.9% (New York Times)

The 99 per cent slogan is great, writes Paul Krugman, but it actually aims too low. A big chunk of the top 1 per cent's gains have gone to an even smaller group, the top 0.1 per cent.

2. Bye Bye Biden? (Wall Street Journal)

Peter Du Point thinks Obama may be eyeing Mrs. Clinton for the 2012 ticket.

3. The GOP contemplates a marriage (Washington Post)

Michael Gerson reports on the GOP's latest choice: Steady Romney or risky Gingrich?

4. Stuffing ourselves on Black Friday (Los Angeles Times)

On the biggest shopping day of the year, Annie Leonard and Rick Ridgeway suggest you think for a moment about the demands our consumption makes on the planet's resources and ask: Does our family need more stuff?

5. Hard drives, hard questions (Boston Globe) ($)

This editorial argues Republican primary voters deserve more give and take from candidate Mitt Romney, who criticizes the Obama administration for a lack of transparency.

6. Congress, don't fail us now (Denver Post)

Not acting on payroll tax cuts, unemployment benefits and Medicare would result in disaster, says this editorial.

7. Prison dysfunction (Chicago Tribune)

Jonah Goldberg describes "why we love all those criminals"

8. History too kind to Puritans' brutal intolerance (Detroit Free Press)

Eric Sharp syas Americans should give a thought to the enduring myth that Thanksgiving perpetuates.

9. Why the 'supercommittee' failed (USA Today)

One reason is political polarization, says this editorial. Another is that party leaders delegated the job to people with less clout.

10. Why We Spend, Why They Save (New York Times)

Europeans save more than Americans do. Sheldon Garon asks: "what can we learn from them?"

BBC
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“Why are you here?”: Juncker and MEPs mock Nigel Farage at the European Parliament

Returning to the scene of the crime.

In today's European Parliament session, Jean-Claude Juncker, president of the European Commission, tried his best to keep things cordial during a debate on Brexit. He asked MEPs to "respect British democracy and the way it voiced its view".

Unfortunately, Nigel Farage, UKIP leader and MEP, felt it necessary to voice his view a little more by applauding - the last straw even for Juncker, who turned and spat: "That's the last time you are applauding here." 

MEPs laughed and clapped, and he continued: "I am surprised you are here. You are fighting for the exit. The British people voted in f avour of the exit. Why are you here?"  

Watch the exchange here:

Farage responded with an impromptu speech, in which he pointed out that MEPs laughed when he first planned to campaign for Britain to leave the EU: "Well, you're not laughing now". Hee said the EU was in "denial" and that its project had "failed".

MPs booed again.

He continued:

"Because what the little people did, what the ordinary people did – what the people who’d been oppressed over the last few years who’d seen their living standards go down did – was they rejected the multinationals, they rejected the merchant banks, they rejected big politics and they said actually, we want our country back, we want our fishing waters back, we want our borders back. 

"We want to be an independent, self-governing, normal nation. That is what we have done and that is what must happen. In doing so we now offer a beacon of hope to democrats across the rest of the European continent. I’ll make one prediction this morning: the United Kingdom will not be the last member state to leave the European Union."

The Independent has a full transcript of the speech.

Now, it sounds like Farage had something prepared – so it's no wonder he turned up in Brussels for this important task today, while Brexiteers in Britain frantically try to put together a plan for leaving the EU.

But your mole has to wonder if perhaps, in the face of a falling British pound and a party whose major source of income is MEP salaries and expenses, Farage is less willing to give up his cushy European job than he might like us to think. 

I'm a mole, innit.