Will this video be enough to save Rick Perry's campaign?

The Texas governor has released a campaign video rounding on Barack Obama for his "socialist" polici

Perhaps reeling from his recent gaffes, Republican White House hopeful Rick Perry has released a new campaign ad which sharpens his criticism of President Barack Obama.

A sinister opening score -- which has become a leitmotif for Obama in any ad of this ilk -- shows the President saying that Americans have been "a little lazy I think over the last couple of decades."

"Can you believe that?" an incredulous Perry asks as he stands outside in a casual shirt, face laden with make-up, the backing music suddenly optimistic and inspirational. He labels the comments "pathetic", later rounding on Obama for his "socialist policies [that] are bankrupting America".

Bankruptcy is not something Perry himself needs to worry about. Despite the infamous "Oops" moment that saw his popularity all but plummet, (Perry is now polling in single digits in some national polls), the early success and momentum of his campaign managed to draw in enough financial backing to effectively bank-roll his activities in the latter stages of the Republican nomination process.

So we can expect more of the same, maybe a little nastier, as the Perry team focuses on the state of Iowa, the first to go to the polls on 3 January 2012. But if Perry doesn't manage to re-take some lost ground pretty quickly, he may not even last that long in the race; his backers could be demading a refund.

 

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Munich shootings: The bloody drama where everyone knows their part

A teenage gunman murdered nine people in Munich on Friday night. 

At time of writing, we know only certain facts about the gunman who shot and killed nine people and wounded many more at a shopping centre in Munich.

He was 18 years old. He was German-Iranian. He was reported to have shouted: "I am German." After murdering his innocent victims he killed himself.

We don't know his motive. We may never truly understand his motive. And yet, over the last few years, we have all come to know the way this story goes.

There is a crowd, usually at ease - concertgoers, revellers or, in this case, shoppers. Then the man - it's usually a man - arrives with a gun or whatever other tool of murder he can get his hands on. 

As he unleashes terror on the crowd, he shouts something. This is the crucial part. He may be a loner, an outsider or a crook, but a few sentences is all it takes to elevate him into the top ranks of the Islamic State or the neo-Nazi elite.

Even before the bystanders have reported this, world leaders are already reacting. In the case of Munich, the French president Francois Hollande called Friday night's tragedy a "disgusting terrorist attack" aimed at stirring up fear. 

Boris Johnson, the UK's new foreign secretary, went further. At 9.30pm, while the attack was ongoing, he said

"If, as seems very likely, this is another terrorist incident, then I think it proves once again that we have a global phenomenon now and a global sickness that we have to tackle both at source - in the areas where the cancer is being incubated in the Middle East - and also of course around the world."

On Saturday morning, reports of multiple gunmen had boiled down to one, now dead, teenager. the chief of Munich police stated the teenage gunman's motive was "fully unknown". Iran, his second country of citizenship, condemned "the killing of innocent and defenceless people". 

And Europe's onlookers are left with sympathy for the victims, and a question. How much meaning should we ascribe to such an attack? Is it evidence of what we fear - that Western Europe is under sustained attack from terrorists? Or is this simply the work of a murderous, attention-seeking teenager?

In Munich, mourners lay flowers. Flags fly at half mast. The facts will come out, eventually. But by that time, the world may have drawn its own conclusions.