Perry attacks "Romney's Remedy"

Texas Governor on the offensive in dramatic new video invites charges of desperation.

Rick Perry has gone on the attack ahead of tonight's sixth GOP primary debate in New Hampshire. In an attempt to recover his status as frontrunner in the race to be the Republican's 2012 presidential nominee, the Texas Governor has released a controversial new video, only to be broadcast online, designed to cast doubt over Mitt Romney's conservative credentials.

The sixty second film -- which runs like a trailer for a Hollywood action blockbuster, replete with dramatic score -- features an image of President Obama facing a mirror that frames Romney's reflection and a clip of Romney confessing that there are "lots of good reasons" not to elect him. It also claims Romney's Massachusetts healthcare legislation ("Romneycare") cost $8bn to implement and "killed" 18,000 jobs. It ends with the tag, "Romney: Change you can believe in?" -- an appropriation of the slogan Obama used, successfully, in 2008.

However, Perry's decision to go on the offensive could backfire. Since he entered the field in August, his poll ratings have slumped: the most recent survey of Republican voters, published last week by Zogby, placed him third, behind Romney and Herman Cain, with just 12 per cent support -- and this latest move may serve to confirm the impression that his campaign peaked too early following an initial surge. Romney's task tonight is to articulate a simple message in direct, old-fashion terms. Desperation is not a good look.

 

 

James Maxwell is a Scottish political journalist. He is based between Scotland and London.

Photo: Getty
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Donald Trump tweets he is “saddened” – but not about the earthquake in Mexico

Barack Obama and Jeremy Corbyn sent messages of sympathy to Mexico. 

A devastating earthquake in Mexico has killed at least 217 people, with rescue efforts still going on. School children are among the dead.

Around the world, politicians have been quick to offer their sympathy, not least Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, whose wife hails from Mexico. He tweeted: "My thoughts are with all those affected by today's earthquake in Mexico. Pensando en todos los afectados por el terremoto en México hoy" in the early hours of the morning, UK time.

Barack Obama may no longer be an elected politician, but he too offered a heartfelt message to those suffering, and like Corbyn, he wrote some of it in Spanish. "Thinking about our neighbors in Mexico and all our Mexican-American friends tonight. Cuidense mucho y un fuerte abrazo para todos," he tweeted. 

But what about the man now installed in the White House, Donald Trump? The Wall Builder-in-Chief was not idle on Tuesday night - in fact, he shared a message to the world via Twitter an hour after Obama. He too was "saddened" by what he had heard on Tuesday evening, news that he dubbed "the worst ever".

Yes, that's right. The Emmys viewing figures.

"I was saddened to see how bad the ratings were on the Emmys last night - the worst ever," he tweeted. "Smartest people of them all are the "DEPLORABLES."

No doubt Mexican president Enrique Peña Nieto will get round to offering the United States his commiserations soon. 

I'm a mole, innit.