Joe the Plumber to run for Congress

The everyman who became the hero of rightwing America hopes to enter House of Representatives.

It's been three years since Samuel Joseph Wurzelbacher, the Ohio man dubbed "Joe the Plumber", hurtled into the public eye after berating then-presidential candidate Barack Obama on tax policy. Now, the man who was referred to more than two dozen times during 2008's presidential debates had announced that he is running for Congress.

After his five-minutes of fame, Wurzelbacher became something of an icon for anti-establishment Republicans, touring the country to speak at Tea Party events. He was seen as everyman, the representative of hardworking America (although it later emerged that he was not a licensed plumber). Not one to miss a trick, he's also secured a book deal and recorded a country music record. He announced yesterday that he will run as Republican candidate for the House of Representatives in Ohio's 9th Congressional District, which includes the city of Toledo.

In his announcement, he said:

If I'm coming off as angry, it's because I am. I just can't stand it when people do bad work. And we've been voting, the last 40 or 50 years, (for) bad people to do bad things to us. Why have we been doing it? Because we don't take our civic responsibility seriously enough.

His new campaign website, Joeforcongress2012.com, promises that he will be "a fierce advocate for working class, conservative values" in Washington. Wurzelbacher has previously been dismissive of politics as a whole, and said that he'd decided to enter as a Republican because he didn't think he could win as an independent. "Is it the lesser of two evils?" he said. "I don't know."

Samira Shackle is a freelance journalist, who tweets @samirashackle. She was formerly a staff writer for the New Statesman.

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Theresa May takes early lead in the Conservative leadership race

The first poll of the Tory contest puts the Home Secretary well out in front

Theresa May, the Home Secretary is well ahead among Conservative members according to a new YouGov poll for the Times

She is both the preferred first choice of a plurality of members from an open field (she secures 37 per cent of the vote, with her nearest rival, Boris Johnson, 10 points behind) and roundly trounces Johnson with 55 per cent to 38 per cent. In all other head-to-heads, Johnson wins comfortably.

Although YouGov have a patchy recent record in national contests - they predicted the London mayoral victory but failed to foresee the Conservative majority or the Brexit vote - they are four for four as far as internal party contests are concerned, having accurately predicted both the result and the final vote share of the 2015 and 2010 Labour leadership contests and the 2005 and 2001 Conservative contests. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.