US politics from outside the beltway

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US Press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. Herman Cain: An updated Hollywood hero (Politico)

Americans love nothing more than a hero who overcomes daunting obstacles, Jeff Greenfield writes.

2. Rescuing America from Wall Street (Washington Post)

Once the servant of industry, banking became America's dominant industry, says Harold Meyerson. "It has ceased to serve us. We serve it." This is a protest that can end our subservience, he argues.

3. Christie leaves GOP no Mr. Right (USA Today)

This year's casting around for a candidate is a remarkable switch for the Republicans, notes this editorial.

4. A rising voice challenges the power of big money (Detroit Free Press)

This editorial supports the Occupy Wall Street protests: theirs "are the voices no longer audible through the normal channels of the political process."

5. How About a Little Danish? (New York Times)

As another European country institutes a tax on unhealthful foods, Americans should pay attention, writes Mark Bittman.

6. Lure overseas cash back to US (Boston Globe)

Scott LeHigh argues it's money that could give the tepid US economy a much-needed booster shot of cash.

7. Bishops are squandering a rich tradition of moral teaching (Star Tribune)

The teachings of a particular religious hierarchy cannot be the basis for denying basic human rights to a segment of the population, argues Neil Elliot.

8. The scapegoating of Amanda Knox (Los Angeles Times)

In person, in prison and in the media, the woman convicted by an Italian court of murder -- and now exonerated -- was subjected to all manner of outlandish, misogynistic behavior, writes Nina Burleigh.

9. The rich are under attack. Poor dears! (The Oregonian)

You would never guess from all the talk of demonization that the rich enjoy perhaps the strongest PR machine on the planet, remarks Barbara Ehrenreich.

10. Will Copyright Stifle Hollywood? (New York Times)

Peter DeCherney says the Supreme Court should conclude that Congress went too far in altering the copyright system.