US Press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. Herman Cain: An updated Hollywood hero (Politico)

Americans love nothing more than a hero who overcomes daunting obstacles, Jeff Greenfield writes.

2. Rescuing America from Wall Street (Washington Post)

Once the servant of industry, banking became America's dominant industry, says Harold Meyerson. "It has ceased to serve us. We serve it." This is a protest that can end our subservience, he argues.

3. Christie leaves GOP no Mr. Right (USA Today)

This year's casting around for a candidate is a remarkable switch for the Republicans, notes this editorial.

4. A rising voice challenges the power of big money (Detroit Free Press)

This editorial supports the Occupy Wall Street protests: theirs "are the voices no longer audible through the normal channels of the political process."

5. How About a Little Danish? (New York Times)

As another European country institutes a tax on unhealthful foods, Americans should pay attention, writes Mark Bittman.

6. Lure overseas cash back to US (Boston Globe)

Scott LeHigh argues it's money that could give the tepid US economy a much-needed booster shot of cash.

7. Bishops are squandering a rich tradition of moral teaching (Star Tribune)

The teachings of a particular religious hierarchy cannot be the basis for denying basic human rights to a segment of the population, argues Neil Elliot.

8. The scapegoating of Amanda Knox (Los Angeles Times)

In person, in prison and in the media, the woman convicted by an Italian court of murder -- and now exonerated -- was subjected to all manner of outlandish, misogynistic behavior, writes Nina Burleigh.

9. The rich are under attack. Poor dears! (The Oregonian)

You would never guess from all the talk of demonization that the rich enjoy perhaps the strongest PR machine on the planet, remarks Barbara Ehrenreich.

10. Will Copyright Stifle Hollywood? (New York Times)

Peter DeCherney says the Supreme Court should conclude that Congress went too far in altering the copyright system.

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Donald Trump's inauguration signals the start of a new and more unstable era

A century in which the world's hegemonic power was a rational actor is about to give way to a more terrifying reality. 

For close to a century, the United States of America has been the world’s paramount superpower, one motivated by, for good and for bad, a rational and predictable series of motivations around its interests and a commitment to a rules-based global order, albeit one caveated by an awareness of the limits of enforcing that against other world powers.

We are now entering a period in which the world’s paramount superpower is neither led by a rational or predictable actor, has no commitment to a rules-based order, and to an extent it has any guiding principle, they are those set forward in Donald Trump’s inaugural: “we will follow two simple rules: hire American and buy American”, “from this day forth, it’s going to be America first, only America first”.

That means that the jousting between Trump and China will only intensify now that he is in office.  The possibility not only of a trade war, but of a hot war, between the two should not be ruled out.

We also have another signal – if it were needed – that he intends to turn a blind eye to the actions of autocrats around the world.

What does that mean for Brexit? It confirms that those who greeted the news that an US-UK trade deal is a “priority” for the incoming administration, including Theresa May, who described Britain as “front of the queue” for a deal with Trump’s America, should prepare themselves for disappointment.

For Europe in general, it confirms what should already been apparent: the nations of Europe are going to have be much, much more self-reliant in terms of their own security. That increases Britain’s leverage as far as the Brexit talks are concerned, in that Britain’s outsized defence spending will allow it acquire goodwill and trade favours in exchange for its role protecting the European Union’s Eastern border.

That might allow May a better deal out of Brexit than she might have got under Hillary Clinton. But there’s a reason why Trump has increased Britain’s heft as far as security and defence are concerned: it’s because his presidency ushers in an era in which we are all much, much less secure. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.