US politics from outside the beltway

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US Press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. Wall Street protesters need to be focused, practical (Chicago Sun Times)

Of course Occupy Wall Street makes sense, says this editorial. As do Occupy Chicago, Occupy Atlanta and all the other offshoots of this national grassroots protest movement against the lopsided power of corporate and Wall Street interests in American political and economic life.

2. Don't make it hard to vote (Philadelphia Inquirer)

In 14 states controlled by Republican legislators, voters face new restrictions that "could make it significantly harder ... to cast ballots in 2010," reports this editorial.

3. How to Fix California's Democracy Crisis (New York Times)

Direct democracy in California was meant to bring the people into the governance process, but voters have become consumers of television sound-bite campaigns, writes James S. Fishkin.

4. Who signed Anwar al-Awlaki's death warrant? (Washington Post)

Richard Cohen does not share Ron Paul's indignation, but does share his dismay: A U.S. citizen was killed on a functionary's say-so.

5. NASA needs clear mission (Omaha World Herald)

There is no way to know what advances might come from new NASA research, concedes this editorial. What is certain, though, is that without a farsighted commitment by NASA, those advances will not be made in America.

6. How the Campaign Season Got So Long (Wall Street Journal)

Thank Jimmy Carter for the seemingly interminable presidential horse race, says Larry J. Sabato -- and the state of Florida, too.

7. You Have to Gamble on Your Health (New York Times)

H. Gilbert Welch asks: Is screening for prostate cancer and breast cancer worth it? No matter what the task force recommends, there is no easy answer.

8. Morality, not theology (Los Angeles Times)

With his swipe at Mitt Romney's Mormonism at the Value Voters Summit, Robert Jeffress played into the worst stereotypes about the GOP as a bigoted and theocratic party for evangelical Christians alone, writes Jonah Goldberg.

9. Districts should be based on common interests (Boston Globe)

The districts should be as compact as possible, respect municipal boundaries as much as possible, and split up natural constituencies as little as possible, says this editorial.

10. This Is Not Your Father's Democratic Party (Roll Call)

For anyone old enough to remember Bucky Dent's memorable home run in the 1978 Yankees-Red Sox playoff, the current makeup and political strategy of the Democratic Party has to seem very odd, and while that was an asset in 2006 and 2008, it very definitely looks like a problem in 2012, writes Stuart Rothenberg.