US Press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. My Tax and Spending Reform Plan (Wall Street Journal)

"Individuals will have the option of paying a 20 per cent flat-rate income tax and I'll cap spending at 18 per cent of GDP," writes Republican presidential hopeful, Rick Perry.

2. Obama should give press access to his fundraisers (San Francisco Chronicle)

The Obama White House's restrictions on media access to its fundraising events makes a mockery of its claim to be the most transparent administration in history, argues this editorial.

3. Living dirt poor (Chicago Tribune)

Urged on by Occupy Chicago and the other protest movements, Dennis Byrne considers gauging misery and despair among the nation's destitute.

4. Will Amazon Kill Off Publishers? (New York Times)

What happens when more writers have the option of a one-stop shop: agent, publisher and bookseller? Authors and publishers debate.

5. The Beauty of Institutions (New York Times)

The European Union was not created to deliver Europeans to postmodern bliss but to prevent another hell. It's doing just that, says Roger Cohen.

6. George Clooney is wrong on politics (Politico)

Martin Frost asks: In Ides of March, has the actor produced and directed a movie that might depress turnout in 2012?

7. Too hot to ignore (Washington Post)

Eugene Robinson considers the scientific finding that settles the climate-change debate.

8. 9-9-no way (Washington Times)

Herman Cain's plan raises a constitutional conundrum, concedes Milton R. Wolf.

9. American imperialism? Please (Los Angeles Times)

The upside to the US leaving Iraq is that it should quell the nonsensical talk about empire-building, writes Jonah Goldberg.

10. The revolution now in Silicon Valley (Houston Chronicle)

While Wall Street is being rattled by a social revolution, Silicon Valley is being by transformed by another technology revolution, says Thomas Freidman -- one that is taking the world from connected to hyperconnected and individuals from empowered to superempowered.

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When Donald Trump talks, remember that Donald Trump almost always lies

Anyone getting excited about a trade deal between the United States and the United Kingdom should pay more attention to what Trump does, not what he says. 

Celebrations all round at the Times, which has bagged the first British newspaper interview with President-Elect Donald Trump.

Here are the headlines: he’s said that the EU has become a “vehicle for Germany”, that Nato is “obsolete” as it hasn’t focused on the big issue of the time (tackling Islamic terrorism), and that he expects that other countries will join the United Kingdom in leaving the European Union.

But what will trigger celebrations outside of the News Building is that Trump has this to say about a US-UK trade deal: his administration will ““work very hard to get it done quickly and done properly”. Time for champagne at Downing Street?

When reading or listening to an interview with Donald Trump, don’t forget that this is the man who has lied about, among other things, who really paid for gifts to charity on Celebrity Apprentice, being named Michigan’s Man of the Year in 2011, and making Mexico pay for a border wall between it and the United States. So take everything he promises with an ocean’s worth of salt, and instead look at what he does.   

Remember that in the same interview, the President-Elect threatened to hit BMW with sanctions over its decision to put a factory in Mexico, not the United States. More importantly, look at the people he is appointing to fill key trade posts: they are not free traders or anything like it. Anyone waiting for a Trump-backed trade deal that is “good for the UK” will wait a long time.

And as chess champion turned Putin-critic-in-chief Garry Kasparov notes on Twitter, it’s worth noting that Trump’s remarks on foreign affairs are near-identical to Putin’s. The idea that Nato’s traditional purpose is obsolete and that the focus should be on Islamic terrorism, meanwhile, will come as a shock to the Baltic states, and indeed, to the 650 British soldiers who have been sent to Estonia and Poland as part of a Nato deployment to deter Russian aggression against those countries.

All in all, I wouldn’t start declaring the new President is good news for the UK just yet.

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.