US Press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. My Tax and Spending Reform Plan (Wall Street Journal)

"Individuals will have the option of paying a 20 per cent flat-rate income tax and I'll cap spending at 18 per cent of GDP," writes Republican presidential hopeful, Rick Perry.

2. Obama should give press access to his fundraisers (San Francisco Chronicle)

The Obama White House's restrictions on media access to its fundraising events makes a mockery of its claim to be the most transparent administration in history, argues this editorial.

3. Living dirt poor (Chicago Tribune)

Urged on by Occupy Chicago and the other protest movements, Dennis Byrne considers gauging misery and despair among the nation's destitute.

4. Will Amazon Kill Off Publishers? (New York Times)

What happens when more writers have the option of a one-stop shop: agent, publisher and bookseller? Authors and publishers debate.

5. The Beauty of Institutions (New York Times)

The European Union was not created to deliver Europeans to postmodern bliss but to prevent another hell. It's doing just that, says Roger Cohen.

6. George Clooney is wrong on politics (Politico)

Martin Frost asks: In Ides of March, has the actor produced and directed a movie that might depress turnout in 2012?

7. Too hot to ignore (Washington Post)

Eugene Robinson considers the scientific finding that settles the climate-change debate.

8. 9-9-no way (Washington Times)

Herman Cain's plan raises a constitutional conundrum, concedes Milton R. Wolf.

9. American imperialism? Please (Los Angeles Times)

The upside to the US leaving Iraq is that it should quell the nonsensical talk about empire-building, writes Jonah Goldberg.

10. The revolution now in Silicon Valley (Houston Chronicle)

While Wall Street is being rattled by a social revolution, Silicon Valley is being by transformed by another technology revolution, says Thomas Freidman -- one that is taking the world from connected to hyperconnected and individuals from empowered to superempowered.

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Britain is running out of allies as it squares up to Russia

For whatever reason, Donald Trump is going to be no friend of an anti-Russia foreign policy.

The row over Donald Trump and that dossier rumbles on.

Nothing puts legs on a story like a domestic angle, and that the retired spy who compiled the file is a one of our own has excited Britain’s headline writers. The man in question, Christopher Steele, has gone to ground having told his neighbour to look after his cats before vanishing.

Although the dossier contains known errors, Steele is regarded in the intelligence community as a serious operator not known for passing on unsubstantiated rumours, which is one reason why American intelligence is investigating the claims.

“Britain's role in Trump dossier” is the Telegraph’s splash, “The ‘credible’ ex-MI6 man behind Trump Russia report” is the Guardian’s angle, “British spy in hiding” is the i’s splash.

But it’s not only British headline writers who are exercised by Mr Steele; the Russian government is too. “MI6 officers are never ex,” the Russian Embassy tweeted, accusing the UK of “briefing both ways - against Russia and US President”. “Kremlin blames Britain for Trump sex storm” is the Mail’s splash.

Elsewhere, Crispin Blunt, the chair of the Foreign Affairs Select Committee, warns that relations between the United Kingdom and Russia are as “bad as they can get” in peacetime.

Though much of the coverage of the Trump dossier has focused on the eyecatching claims about whether or not the President-Elect was caught in a Russian honeytrap, the important thing, as I said yesterday, is that the man who is seven days from becoming President of the United States, whether through inclination or intimidation, is not going to be a reliable friend of the United Kingdom against Russia.

Though Emanuel Macron might just sneak into the second round of the French presidency, it still looks likely that the final choice for French voters will be an all-Russia affair, between Francois Fillon and Marine Le Pen.

For one reason or another, Britain’s stand against Russia looks likely to be very lonely indeed.

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.