US politics from outside the beltway

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US Press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. Yes, let's put health care on the table (Star Tribune)

Putting states in charge is a great start, writes Amy Lange. Just remember it's not all broken.

2. 5 rules for faith and politics 2012 (USA Today)

David Saperstein and Oliver Thomas propose guidelines for protecting religion and democracy.

3. No Holiday (New York Times)

This NYT editorial argues a tax holiday would be a windfall for major corporations at the expense of everyone else, and it would raise the deficit.

4. Obama's Re-Election Model Is FDR (Wall Street Journal)

President Obama is cozying up to the "Occupy Wall Street" movement, intending to make resentment of big business a central theme of his re-election campaign. Paul Moreno writes that similarly, with the economy sinking in 1937, Roosevelt accused business of sabotage.

5. Can we build great things again? (New York Daily News)

Eighty years ago today, with great fanfare, the George Washington Bridge was opened. As Americans celebrate the anniversary of that great span connecting Manhattan and New Jersey, we must swallow a sad truth: If today we wished to build an American-made steel bridge as grand, we simply couldn't, writes Joan Marans Dim.

6. A true believer on defense (Boston Globe)

Will a hawkish stance quell GOP doubts about Romney's candidacy? asks James Carroll.

7. City Hall's embrace of Occupy L.A. (Los Angeles Times)

It's hard to rebel against those who are mostly intent on embracing you, says Jim Newton.

8. The budget shirkers (Washington Post)

Clinton and Bush owe us an apology, writes Robert J. Samuelson.

9. Stop spamming Cuba (Los Angeles Times)

An American company last month began sending thousands of unsolicited text messages a week to cellphones in Cuba under an $84,000 annual government contract. This editorial says: "That's dumb."

10. Why Washington needs a laugh (Politico)

Cappy McGarr and Jeff Nussbaum ask: Why is it that Washington evokes all sorts of laughter, but does so little laughing itself?